Checkmating Christianity: What India Can Learn From Japan
Posted on January 4th, 2022

Rakesh Krishnan Simha @ByRakeshSimha courtesy Indiafacts

Japan and India are the last two dharmic nations in the world. While Japan has avoided being sucked into Christianity’s digestive tract, Indic religions are losing members to the Abrahamic aggressor.

What can be done to stop this?

Playing Ostrich will only cause more harm. 

The defining takeaway from the episode of thousands of infant children being sold by Mother Teresa’s Missionaries of Charity is that there is no love in the ‘Religion of Love’. Christianity has become a business that primarily deals in the harvest of souls and for that it is willing to do the most reprehensible acts – such as selling new born babies in the manner that pet shops trade in puppies and kittens. There’s a difference though – animals sold in pet shops usually go to good, loving homes. On the other hand, Mother Teresa’s nuns weren’t the least bit bothered that innocent babies could end up in the hands of paedophiles, pimps or abusive foster parents.

The cult of Jesus is a toxic religion that has penetrated the vital organs of the nation state and threatens to weaken it from within. Whether it is nuclear weapons, strengthening the defence forces, strategic rockets or surgical strikes, Christians – whether they are politicians, bureaucrats or journalists – support the US, Pakistani and Chinese positions at the expense of national security.

Christians act against India’s national interests because they take their cue from their churches. This is because Christianity has no noble intentions in India – or for that matter anywhere. Like a parasite, it slowly and relentless destroys its host, as pagan civilisations such as Rome and Greece discovered in the ancient past. The impunity with which Christians attempt to destroy the very society that allows them to grow is aptly illustrated by Pope John Paul II’s call to the church in 1999 to redouble its efforts to convert Indians. Just as the first millennium saw the cross firmly planted in the soil of Europe, and the second in that of America and Africa, so may the third Christian millennium witness a great harvest of faith on this vast and vital continent,” he told a crowd at New Delhi’s Jawaharlal Nehru stadium. (1) The irony was that the Pope’s exhortation – which implied the destruction of Hindu India – was made on November 8 which marked Diwali, the most auspicious of Hindu festivals.

https://indiafacts.org/checkmating-christianity-what-india-can-learn-from-japan/

2 Responses to “Checkmating Christianity: What India Can Learn From Japan”

  1. Ratanapala Says:

    Christian Church!

    Christian Church in its various forms constitute the continuation of the Bloody Roman Empire by other means. The initial goal was for world domination. This was the period when Papal Bulls was considered a direct order from God conveyed through the Pope to be followed by all Western Christian Nations. Today all that former glory is gone. Today their ‘glory’ is getting spat on at Court Rooms around the world for Pedophylia, Money Laundering and People Trafficking.

    And yet and still it remains corrupting influrence on world stage playing cat’s paw to Western Christian Nations in their quest for world domination. It is still in the business of conversions. Wherever there are the poor, the sick and the destitute these rats invade and spread the ‘god disease’!

    Making more Christian Soldiers – cannon fodder for the Empire!

  2. aloy Says:

    A New Zealand based South Indian cooly used by the West themselves for divide and rule!.

    Birds of a feather flock together, they say.

    The fellow is exploiting the minds of people with disadvantages. Exactly what the authorities everywhere does for their own ends. You can identify them from their lack of empathy towards their citizens.

    I ask LankaWEB why give space for explosive articles like this in these turbulent times in our country to create further disunity.

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