Security perspectives of province-based devolution: A reappraisal

June 5th, 2013

by G. H. Peiris Courtesy Island

ƒÆ’-¡ Dr. Dayan Jayatilleka’s latest contribution to the debate he and I have been having on the Thirteenth Amendment (and ‘province-based devolution’) has been quite an antidote to lethargy and disinterest which is said to be an after effect of a nasty attack of dengue. He says what he feels he has to with a certain elegance and flair that has an invigorating effect. What he lacks in substance, he quite often (but not always) makes up with style. So, I have reasons to be grateful for his piece titled ‘Devolution, Sri Lanka’s defence and security: A realist response to Prof GH Peiris’ (The Island of 23 May), thus giving me the energy to place his professed realism under further scrutiny.

ƒÆ’-¡ The ‘Devolve or Perish’ Warning

ƒÆ’-¡ When stripped of the usual bombastic phraseology ? “collective cognitive dissonance” and “the line of fire of Indian kinetic power” are two of the more interesting ones in this instalment of the ‘Dayan Chintanaya’ ? there is little that is not repetitive of what he has already said. He has reformulated his earlier assertion on the antecedents of province-based devolution facilitated by the Thirteenth Amendment in a futile attempt to make it sound marginally more plausible. He has repeated his claim that it was Sri Lanka’s failure to devolve power on the basis of a province framework (conforming to the ‘two-nation theory’ adumbrated by the ITAK/TULF and meeting their demand for regional autonomy for an area claimed as the “exclusive traditional Tamil homeland’) that precipitated the Indian intervention. He has tried to reinforce his earlier ‘devolve or perish’ theme with a fanciful Armageddon scenario which, according to him, reflects the “… the realities of the balance of power and the island’s strategic vulnerability”. Countering these assertions without repeating myself is difficult. But I’ll try, confining as far as possible to the specificities that have been highlighted by him this time in order to strengthen his earlier claims.

ƒÆ’-¡ First of all, there is Dr. DJ’s persistence with the Bandaranaike avatar of the late 1920s, the barely perceptible ‘regional autonomy’ idea in the conglomerate of political thought (including a preference for ‘Ceylon’ to remain a part of the British Empire ? believe it or not!) that prevailed during the decades that followed, and the tenuous and tentative agreement between SWRD Bandaranaike and SJV Chelvanayagam in the aftermath of the ethnic riots of 1956 (the prelude to ‘Emergency ’58’) ? a ‘pact’ which almost the entire spectrum of political opinion barring a thin scatter of diehard Trotskyites promptly rejected.

ƒÆ’-¡ About SWRD’s federal proposal which, as I pointed out earlier, was largely an exercise in “kite-flying” by an ambitious political novitiate (“born to rule”, as his daughter was to inform us about 70 years later), there is another dimension which Dayan has missed. A similar proposal, we recollect, was submitted to the Donoughmore Commission two years later by an obscure radala delegation from the highlands whose barely concealed motive was that of clearing the Kandyan decks of the Soyzas, Silvas and Fernandos. In the context of what we know of Bandaranaike’s vacillating stances in relation to contemporary issues of vital importance to the country such as communal representation and universal adult franchise, there is reason to imagine that he too, yet to discard the Brown Sahib garb, would have considered it a “jolly good thing” if it is possible to banish the Arunachalams, Saravanamuttus, and the Ponnambalams from the centre stage of national politics to their ‘homeland’ in the north. Needless to say, Donoughmore and his partner saw through these bogus humanitarian postures. Had they been taken seriously, we might well have had a ‘Ceylon’ consisting of three of four large ethnic ghettos by the time it acquired dominion status.

ƒÆ’-¡ Dr. DJ does not concede the point that there could have been outcomes of province-based devolution (or ‘regional autonomy’ which the ‘B-C Pact’ if implemented against the wishes of the overwhelming majority of Sri Lankans including a large segment of the Tamil community would have facilitated) other than what he naively imagines ? that of the northern Tamil leadership accepting without reservation the concept of a unitary Sri Lanka in exchange for regional autonomy for the claimed ‘homeland’, reduced in size (as it had to be) to the Northern Province. There are several corollaries to this one-track mindset, one of which is that the only alternative to regional autonomy for the Northern Province is military rule over that part of the country. Another is that neither the “international community” (i.e. governments whose Sri Lankan policy is driven by those sections of the ‘diaspora’ that persist in their commitment to destroy Sri Lanka, the others don’t count), nor a “Tamil party of any significance” will accept anything less than province-based devolution (those who so obviously do, the Vinayagamoorthy Muralitharans, Douglas Devanandas and the Arumugan Thondamans, to name only a few, in Dayan’s thinking are, ipso facto, of no significance – only the Tiger puppets matter).

ƒÆ’-¡ The attempt to draw lessons from the disintegration of Yugoslavia is something of a novelty in Dr. DJ’s present discourse. That he considers Yugoslavia a trump-card in his pack is suggested by the fact that he has repeated it in a more recent piece (The Island, 30 May). To cite Dayan from his 23 May ‘response':

ƒÆ’-¡ “As a student of comparative politics I am keenly aware that the unravelling of Yugoslavia – whose fine army, steeped in guerrilla fighting traditions had long deterred Stalin’s Russia ? commenced precisely with the abolition of the autonomous status of the province of Kosovo. That unravelling was the result of political lobbying and argumentation by Serbian ultranationalists, along exactly the lines that Prof Gerry Peiris and his co-thinkers (such as the Bodu Bala Sena, oxymoronic though it be) that are engaging in today”.

ƒÆ’-¡ I do not mind the personal insult because it is a response of desperation ? a part of the verbal diarrhoea produced by failure to digest facts. Nevertheless I should digress to say that even the concept of a ‘Bala Sena’ (empowered militia) does not conform to my understanding of the essence of Buddhist thought – not that I claim any expertise on the subject. “Oxymoron” is perhaps correct, if it is intended to mean “a combination of contradictory ideas”; and, I have yet to discard from my mind the possibility of the ‘Anti-Halal Campaign’ being yet another exemplification of the on-going, externally induced, multi-pronged subversion of Sri Lankan interests (Even to harbour such a thought, according to the main spokesman of the BBS, is a “mah? p?payak” – I guess I have to take my turn at the katu imbula). Dr. DJ, it is time you realise that demonising Sinhala-Buddhists is just an objectively counterproductive anthropological pastime, and that the long-term record of “inclusivism” (Jaffrelot, 1993) and tolerance of the Buddhist of our country, though not unblemished, is much cleaner than those of other persuasions elsewhere.

ƒÆ’-¡ What I do mind, however, is the utter absurdity of Dr. DJ’s Yugoslav analogy – how on earth can a serious “student of comparative politics” be so superficial (and, so illogical) about what is widely considered the most significant political convulsion of post-war Europe? I should relate as briefly as possible the sad story of Yugoslavia and let the reader decide on the extent to which the abolition of Kosovan autonomy initiated the break-up of Yugoslavia.

ƒÆ’-¡ Disintegration of Yugoslavia

ƒÆ’-¡ The ‘Kingdom of Yugoslavia’ in its modern geographical configurations came into being at the conclusion of the First World War in 1918. Carved out as it was from the former Ottoman and Austro-Hungarian empires, it brought together within a sovereign nation-state several disparate nationalities inhabiting parts of the Balkan peninsula and the Danube basin. Thus, its multi-ethnic population came to comprise Serbs (approximately 37%), Croats (21%), and Bosnian Muslims, a.k.a. ‘Bosniaks’ (12%), Albanians (9%), Slovenes (8%), Macedonian Slavs (6%), Montenegrins (2%), Hungarians (2%) and several smaller groups. Having been subjugated by the Axis Powers in 1941, Yugoslavia regained its sovereignty in 1945 as a ‘socialist republic’ under the control of Marshall Josip Broz Tito, the chief of the country’s communist party, who had led the Yugoslav resistance against the occupying forces during the Second World War. After consolidating his hold over Yugoslavia, Tito severed his links with the Russian Communist Party, and remained the leader of his country until his death in 1980, establishing what has often been described as the most benevolent among the contemporary regimes in Eastern Europe.

ƒÆ’-¡ The federation established under Tito consisted of 6 ‘Republics’ – Serbia (42% of the country’s population), Croatia (21%), Bosnia-Herzegovina (19%), Macedonia (8.4%), Slovenia (7.2%) and Montenegro (2.5%). Within Serbia, the provinces of Vojvodina (with sizeable Hungarians, Czech and Slovac ethnic minorities) and Kosovo (where ethnic Albanians accounted for over 80% of the population) were granted a limited range of special rights of self-government.

ƒÆ’-¡ Until about the early 1970s the Yugoslav economy made impressive progress. In the final phase of the Tito regime, however, two destabilising processes began to operate against the earlier trends – one, the deceleration of growth in the context of global recession resonating in soaring inflation and unemployment in the economy as a whole; and the other, a widening of economic disparities between the different republics. Illustrative of the latter is a set of estimates according to which, by the early 1980s, while unemployment was as high as 50% in Kosovo, 27% in Macedonia, 23% in Bosnia, and 20% in Serbia, it was negligibly low in the wealthier ‘republics’ of Croatia and Slovenia.

ƒÆ’-¡ To trace the principal strands of the deepening crisis that culminated in the dismemberment of Yugoslavia and the brutal civil war that occurred in its wake – it began with the failure of the experiment with ‘collective leadership’ (rotational presidency among the ‘republics’) at the Centre in the aftermath of Tito’s death in 1980. This coincided with the development of splits within the communist party on ethnic lines. More or less simultaneously the Serb leadership attempted to gain control of the central government in Belgrade. This achieved only partial success in the sense that the Serb-controlled Centre then began to lose grip over the other member ‘republics’ of the federation. There was a further escalation of ethnic rivalry when, in 1987, Slobodan Mil?sevic, the leader of the Serbian communist party, wrested control over the central government. He embarked upon a strategy that involved, inter alia, the establishment of exclusive Serb hegemony not only over Serbia through various forms of ‘ethnic cleansing’, but also over other parts of Yugoslavia in which there were Serbian communities. This, in turn, had the effect of inducing the other member ‘republics’ to adopt pre-emptive measures to escape Serb domination.

ƒÆ’-¡ The earliest among such retaliatory measure was the declaration of independence by Slovenia in 1991. A few months later Croatia seceded from the Yugoslav federation. This was associated with violent confrontations between the Croatians and the Serbs living in Croatia. Following a European Community-brokered ceasefire at the end of that year, Croatia gained formal independence. The declaration of independence by Bosnia-Herzegovina in 1992 paved the way for a 3-year civil war in the course of which the Serbs extended their control over almost two-thirds of Bosnian territory.

ƒÆ’-¡ In 1992, when Bosnia-Herzegovina asserted independent nationhood, the Serb-Bosniak confrontations escalated into an open civil war involving, among other things, some of the most brutal forms of ‘ethnic cleansing’ – annihilation of tens of thousands of Bosniaks (reminiscent of the Nazi genocide half a century earlier) as well as their mass eviction from the Serb-majority areas. According to UN estimates, over the three-year period of the civil war, these mass murders and evictions had reduced the population of Bosnia by about 1 million, and created a refugee population of 2.3 million – i.e. 52% of the population of Bosnia as enumerated in 1991.

ƒÆ’-¡ The Serb-Bosnia civil war was brought to an end through the ‘Daytona Accord’ of 1995 brokered by the NATO powers which partitioned Bosnia to create two independent republics – one, named ‘Republika Srpska’, consisting of the Serb-majority areas, and the other named the ‘Bosnia-Croat Federation’, consisting of the remaining areas of Serbia. Meanwhile, in 1992, Serbia and Montenegro were proclaimed the (new) Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY). Mil?sevic’s rule over the FRY continued to be featured not only by economic recession but also by secessionist movements gathering momentum in the province of Kosovo (south-western Serbia) and the ‘republic’ of Montenegro. In Kosovo where about 80% of the population is accounted for by ‘Kosovo Albanians’ had for long been the venue of an incipient separatist movement with the proclaimed goal of either independent nationhood or union with Albania. There emerged in this part of the FRY in the late-1980s a ‘Kosovo Liberation Army’ (KLA) that began to launch guerrilla attacks against the Serb security forces. At the height of FRY-KLA confrontations almost a million inhabitants of Kosovo had been displaced, and tens of thousands had been killed. The final outcome of these developments was the formal termination of the lose association between Serbia and Montenegro in 2006, and the UN-backed declaration of independence by Kosova in 2008.

ƒÆ’-¡ What must be noted in particular is that even under Tito the Yugoslav federation was not a liberal democracy (as the concept is generally understood) and that it had a centrally regulated economy and a political apparatus tightly controlled by the ‘League of Communists of Yugoslavia’ headed by its Presidium ? the policy-making body for the entire country. Inter-ethnic power-sharing was thus largely confined to the representation which all ethnic groups had in the communist party and its trade unions. It was, more than all else, the increasing dominance of that party apparatus by the Serbs alongside ethnicity-based factionalism at the higher levels of the party hierarchy that triggered off the disintegration of the federation.

ƒÆ’-¡ In the context of all these considerations what really is amazing is that the man who represented our country at the highest international forum believed (or pretends to believe since that time) that there is any worthwhile parallel between that arbitrarily established nation-state that existed over a brief span of seven decades, a 40-year federation that was tightly controlled by a single political party, and the secession of a tiny segment (4,000 square miles) of what remained of that federation by the early years of the new millennium, to the nation-state of Sri Lanka, the relations between its ethnic groups, and the impulses of the Eelam Wars.

ƒÆ’-¡ Devolution and Empowerment in India

ƒÆ’-¡ In a rebuttal of my suggestion that the implementation of the B-C Pact of 1957 or the document produced by the ‘Political Parties Conference’ of 1986 could have had outcomes different from that visualised by him, Dr. DJ has produced another classic example of superficial understanding of political affairs. It runs as follows:

ƒÆ’-¡ “Well, let the reader judge the lucid realism of that scenario bearing in mind, however, that ‘to go by Indian experience’ as Prof Peiris says we should, nowhere has a region seceded because an agreement for autonomy was arrived at and implemented. On the contrary, every serious scholar agrees that it is precisely the flexible accommodation of regional (sub) nationalisms that has permitted the vastly diverse India to stay together”.

ƒÆ’-¡ Please take a careful look at this exhibition of realism. Now, if a “serious scholar” is defined as a person subscribing to the view that it was the successful accommodation of sub-national demands through territorial devolution that kept India intact, one cannot find fault with what Dr. DJ has said. Unfortunately for him such a definition of “serious scholarship” is tenuous. There happens to be many eminent Indian scholars with impeccable academic credentials and intellectual integrity who admit that territorial devolution has often failed to fulfil the demands of sub-national group interests, that there have been many instances of devolution aggravating rather than diffusing ethnic rivalry, and that, what had held together the Indian union more effectively than all else is the overwhelming military might of the central government of India. This is why one of the leading authorities of comparative politics (Horowitz, 1985) whom I cited earlier has concluded that: “Where central authority is secure, as in India, the appropriate decisions can be made and implemented by the centre. But where the very question is how far the writ of the centre will run, devolution is a matter of bilateral agreement, and an enduring agreement is an elusive thing” (emphasis added).

ƒÆ’-¡ No, I think Dr. DJ should read more, much more, before he could make authoritative pronouncements on Indian experiences. He should read about what happened in the period leading up to, during, and after the Khalistan uprising (one of the closest parallels one could find to our Eelam uprising). He should familiarise himself with the scholarly writings on that misty but persistently turbulent ‘North-East’ of India which, despite India’s admittedly laudable claims of democratic governance, is physically accessible to outsiders only if they obtain Delhi’s permission to go past the Siliguri Corridor. He should learn about the never ending blood-letting between different tribal groups and between the ‘natives’ and the ‘immigrants’, the innumerable ‘liberation armies’ and their outbursts of murderous havoc, and the periodic Delhi-directed ‘cordon, search and liquidate Jawan operations’ that take place virtually unknown to the world outside except through the writings of Indian scholars and journalists. Further, Dr. DJ would do well if he were to try and grasp the extent to which devolution has kept a large part of Kashmir within the Indian Union; And, perhaps more important than all else, the disastrously negative impact of devolution on both India’s relations with its neighbours and Hindu-Muslim relations in India.

ƒÆ’-¡ Swiss Confederacy Model

ƒÆ’-¡ Dismissing my assertion that, given Sri Lanka’s size and form, province-based devolution is unnecessary for Sri Lanka on the grounds that “size has nothing to do with it”, Dr. DJ refers once again to the musings of young Bandaranaike and the not so young Leonard Woolf. My reference to the basic geographical configuration of Sri Lanka as a consideration of relevance was not due to my being unaware of small federations. Apart from Switzerland, there are five other federations ? the tiny archipelagic Micronesia, Comoros, St. Kitts & Nevis, and the lose collection of sheikdoms comprising the United Arab Emirates ? that are much smaller than Sri Lanka. But in all these there are the geographical peculiarities that account for the existing structures of government.

ƒÆ’-¡ The origin of the ‘Swiss Confederation’ could be traced back to the formation of an association of settlements in three Alpine localities referred to as waldstatte (“forest states”) in the 13th century. Its survival and growth in the centuries that followed could be explained mainly with reference to the desire on the part of the people inhabiting this rugged mountainous area, in settlements physically isolated from one another, to collectively safeguard their independence from the powerful kingdoms and empires that rose and fell in the adjacent parts of Europe (Austria, Italy and France) periodically extending their control over parts of the Swiss Alps. By the time the Swiss Confederacy assumed its present geographical configurations in the mid-19th century, it covered about 16,000 sq. miles of territory.

ƒÆ’-¡ While the persistent desire for independence and, in the 20th century, neutrality in the context of the world at war, provided the main impulses for integrity and cohesion of the Swiss confederation, its locational centrality in Europe, periodic invasions (accompanied by migration) from adjacent areas, and the physically disparate nature of its settlements, contributed to the persistence of sharp cultural (ethnic) diversities within its territory. A major ingredient of this diversity is language. About two-thirds of the Swiss population speak German; one-fifth, French; one-tenth, Italian; and one-hundredth, Rhaeto-Romanic. The Swiss population is also divided in roughly equal proportions on the basis of religion ? Protestant and Catholic.

ƒÆ’-¡ The only serious threat to the integrity of the Swiss confederacy occurred as far back as 1847 with the formation of a league referred to as ‘Sonderbund’ consisting of the Roman Catholic cantons, evidently in violation of the Swiss constitution of that time. The ensuing conflict was suppressed by the federal troops the following year, paving the way for the emergence of a stronger central government. This transformation acquired formal expression with the promulgation of a new constitution in 1874 which converted the existing association of cantons into a unified federal state.

ƒÆ’-¡ The basic territorial unit of the Swiss Confederacy is the ‘Commune’ of which there are about 3,000. Communes range in size from less than a tenth of a square mile to about 100 square miles, and are vested with considerable autonomy in many matters that directly concern daily life. For instance, the larger communes have their independent law enforcement institutions. The communes fall within one or another of the 26 ‘Cantons’ or ‘Demicantons’ into which the confederacy is divided. Each canton has almost the entire gamut of institutions of government. There is a close spatial correspondence between clusters of cantons and the distribution of the linguistic groups. If this is what Sri Lanka needs, OK, lets empower the Pradeshiya Sabhas, being cautious, however, of the criminally minded ‘neo-ratemahattayas’ and the ‘neo-arachchis’ who often tend to hold sway at that level.

ƒÆ’-¡ Switzerland has for long enjoyed a high level of political stability, remaining free of violent inter-group conflict. It is regarded as an example of extraordinarily successful federalism in the sense that, while it has preserved its sovereignty, territorial integrity, and neutrality in external relations over several centuries of periodic political upheavals in Europe, since about the mid-19th century, it has also averted internal conflict and accommodated popular participation of all its ethnic groups in the affairs of government.

ƒÆ’-¡ Given these extraordinary circumstances, could there be any pragmatically worthwhile suggestion that the type of territorial devolution in the Swiss confederacy would be appropriate for Sri Lanka? Of Oxford returnee Bandaranaike I have said enough. Leonard Woolf, it is said, was far too dreamy even for Virginia. Attempting to replicate the unique circumstances of successful territorial devolution in Sri Lanka, it seems to me, would be like an attempt to transplant the Swiss Alps on our island territory.

ƒÆ’-¡ External Intervention: “Worst Case Scenario”

ƒÆ’-¡ On this, once again, I need to quote Dr. DJ verbatim as a safeguard against an accusation of sleight-of-hand. This is what he says:

ƒÆ’-¡ “It is not that intervention is already planned. However, the atmosphere, diplomatic (Geneva, New York), conceptual (retroactive R2P) and world opinion, is building up ? or being created ? which is not unpropitious for such intervention and in which any intervention would be readily endorsed. It certain went uncontested in 1987. The last time, Sri Lanka was able to roll back that intervention because the LTTE took on the IPKF, generating collective cognitive dissonance in Tamil Nadu which in turn led to V P Singh making and fulfilling an electoral promise to withdraw Indian troops. In any future scenario of intervention, this factor will not operate. There will be no Tamil army fighting the Indians or anyone else who may come along. There will also be not foreign troops in the Sinhala areas, and therefore no possibility of a heroic, protracted, patriotic guerrilla war of national liberation against them”.

ƒÆ’-¡ Dayan proceeds in this vein, and adds:

ƒÆ’-¡ “I would also draw attention not only to the speculation about US military arrangements with the Maldives, but far more importantly, the supplementing of existing Indian naval air base in the South (which has the longest airstrip in the region) with the brand new airbase in Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu, to which India plans to transfer its top-of-the line Sukhoi SU30MKI war planes. …”

ƒÆ’-¡ Enough is enough; those of us who haven’t cracked our ribs are shivering in our boots! The average reader, I guess, is expected to feel, “look, this guy is such an expert in strategic cum military matters that he even knows from which base the Indian bombardment of Sri Lanka will be launched, and which aircraft will be used for the purpose”. Yet, there are more than a few who would know that much of this is pure bunkum. About the military logistics of the predicted intervention, Dr. DJ should know that Delhi, if it decides (ignoring all consequences) to launch an attack of Sri Lanka, could commence operations from any or all of the 6 major air force bases in the Deccan area; that even by 2005, India had a fleet of about 50 SU30MKIs in its total operational fleet of about 800 fixed-wing military aircraft in addition to a large fleet of attack helicopters, any of which could convey to any part of Sri Lanka anything ranging from a thermonuclear bomb to a consignment of parippu. There is, in addition, the dreadful attack capacity of the Navy, and a huge arsenal of medium range surface-to-air missiles (This is published information, but not ‘Wikileaks’, available to anyone.) As to whether such an attack lies within the bounds to reality, the most persuasive answer I have come across, which cannot be reproduced here, is found in last Sunday’s instalment of the review of Dr. DJ’s magnum opus by the veteran journalist HLD Mahindapala (The Nation, May 26: p. 11).

ƒÆ’-¡ It is mainly as a safeguard against this “worst case scenario” which, according to Dr. DJ, “Sri Lanka must make note of in its security environment and its strategic vulnerabilities”, that he advocates our proceeding with the ‘Thirteenth Amendment’ with the ‘pluses’ as demanded by the “international community”, its lackeys, India, and the remnants of the Eelam campaign, but not necessarily the ordinary people of Sri Lanka including the Tamils who appear to be quite content with their recently found freedom and even the post-war material advances, except when those in the local human rights industry persuade them that they ought not to be. That, of course, does not mean that the Tamil people in the north will readily abandon their primordial loyalties when it comes to voting. If it does not work in the way envisaged by Dr. DJ, well so what? He could always say with hindsight that the ‘plusses’ were inadequate or that timing was wrong, or the central government was provocative in its dealings with the NPC, or that Colombo was not pliant enough in its dealings with the West, or that the Rajapaksa regime has been too friendly with China, etc. etc.

Such explanation would, of course, be of little consolation if the suggested devolution becomes, not a compromise but an irretrievable give-away with no gains in security and internal stability, but permanent losses in respect of vulnerability to external threats. All indications both from past records as well as what could be discerned in the relevant geopolitical configurations are that, from the viewpoint of Sri Lanka’s security, it will inevitably be the latter rather than the former.

Boston Lanka Documentary: Story of Adele Balasingham

June 5th, 2013

In this edition:

The story of Adele Balasingham, who began her career as a nurse and later became a women military leader of LTTE. A story of a woman’s journey from Hospital to battlefield, from being a healing nurse to a killer Nurse.

http://youtu.be/wr8JP5-4lVA

For more up to date news Go to: www.bostonlanka.com

Do we need so many Casinos?

June 5th, 2013

Michelle Alexander

It has been reported that plans are currently underway to build a massiveƒÆ’-¡ Las Vegas-style Casino resort in Colombo, with an investment of US$ 350mn. While the Animal Welfare Bill is yet to be enacted, the Casino Business Regulation Act appears to be alive and kicking and already in use. ƒÆ’-¡ It is also noted that this investment will be exempted from the Corporate Income Tax for as much as ten years. It will be exempted from Betting and Gaming Levy and income tax. All project-related imports will also be exempt from Customs duty. We would only know within the coming days and weeks if this is true and if so, will it come to fruition.

Buddhism, Hinduism and Islam have prohibitions/restrictions on gambling, for many reasons.ƒÆ’-¡  Casinos bring much needed investments and create jobs, but it also leads to a plethora of social ills such as gambling addiction, crime and bankruptcy. As with alcohol and cigarettes, much if not most of the gambling industryƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s revenue comes from addicts.ƒÆ’-¡ There are other negative factors to take into consideration when it comes to casinos, such as money laundering, prostitution and drug trafficking. Addicts not only waste money on gambling and time meant for their loved ones and professional lives, they inevitably have to spend more money on treating their addiction.ƒÆ’-¡ 

One could argue that when it comes to Sri Lanka an investment of US$ 350mn and the creation of jobs outweigh the costs in terms of crime, bankruptcy, and problem gambling. But those costs are real and, the evidence suggests, very large. Further, could we have not obtained similar investments and job opportunities without the addition of yet another casino?

Why the double standards

June 5th, 2013

Michelle Alexander

TheƒÆ’-¡ 23rd Commonwealth Heads of Government MeetingƒÆ’-¡ (CHOGM) will be held in Colombo, Sri Lanka, from 15 to 17 November 2013. However, this occasion is being marred by several International, Diaspora and Sri Lanka-based organizations calling the consideration of Sri Lanka as hostƒÆ’-¡ ‘grossly inappropriate’, with Sri Lanka standing accused of rights abuses, war crimes and even genocide.

While it pertinent for our leaders and us as a nation to honour all moral and legal obligations, the question arises as to why nations such as ours are held accountable to all International laws and conventions, when other nations get away with or have gotten away with far worse, facing little to no consequence. For instance:

The 2003 of Iraq

After the events of September 11, the USA, on totally fabricated reasoning launched an invasion Iraq, an independent and sovereign nation that in no way threatened US citizens. There were no weapons of mass destruction, no real connection to Al-Qaeda (although this may have all changed now) and none of the hijackers involved in the World Trade Center bombings were Iraqis. 15 of the 19 hijackers were Saudi, 2 were from UAE, 1 was from Egypt and the other was from Lebanon.ƒÆ’-¡  Osama Bin Laden, the mastermind of the attacks was a Saudi national. There are also allegations that the US used of depleted Uranium bombs and white phosphorus. The US has since dropped a further 2000-3000 more tons of depleted uranium (DU) which will mean a future generation of children from yet another country will be born with birth defects, the other being children from Vietnam being born with birth defects due to the use of Agent Orange in the Vietnam War. The use of white phosphorous as a weapon is prohibited under Protocol III of the 1980 Convention of Certain Conventional Weapons. White phosphorous can cause injuries and even death in three ways: by burning deep into tissue, by being inhaled as a smoke, and by being ingested. Extensive exposure by burning and ingestion is fatal.

ƒÆ’-¡ 

The United Kingdom and the coalition is accused is multiple rights abuses during the Iraq war.ƒÆ’-¡ 

As a consequence of the war Iraq is becoming destabilized and fragmented due to ensuing sectarian violence, and as of June 21, 2007, theƒÆ’-¡ UNHCRƒÆ’-¡ estimated that over 4.2 millionƒÆ’-¡ IraqisƒÆ’-¡ have been displaced, with 2 million within IraqƒÆ’-¡ and 2.2 million in neighboring countries. Most have ventured toƒÆ’-¡ JordanƒÆ’-¡ andƒÆ’-¡ Syria, creating demographic shifts that have worried both governments.

The only logical assumption one could make is that the only real reason for the current war in Iraq is the access to be gained to its vast oil reserves.

US involvement in regime changes

The USA has been involved in and assisted in theƒÆ’-¡ overthrow of foreign governmentsƒÆ’-¡ (more recently termed “regime change“) without the overt use of U.S. military force. Often, such operations are tasked to theƒÆ’-¡ Central Intelligence AgencyƒÆ’-¡ (CIA). Judging by the some of the countries noted in this list, it begs the question if these nations would have fared better if not for outside interference.

ƒÆ’-¡ 

  • March 1949 Syrian coup d’ƒÆ’†’©tat & 2012
  • 1953 Iranian coup d’ƒÆ’†’©tat & 2005 up to date
  • 1954 Guatemalan coup d’ƒÆ’†’©tat
  • Tibet 1955ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…”70s
  • Indonesia 1958
  • Cuba 1959 (famously known as the Bay of Pigs invasion)
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo 1960ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…”65
  • Iraq 1960ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…”63 & 2002/3 up to date
  • Dominican Republic 1961
  • South Vietnam 1963
  • Brazil 1964
  • Ghana 1966
  • Chile 1970ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…”73
  • Afghanistan 1979ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…”89 & 2001 up to date
  • Turkey 1980
  • Poland 1980ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…”81
  • Nicaragua 1981ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…”90
  • Cambodia 1980ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…”95
  • Angola 1980s
  • Philippines 1986
  • Iraq 1992ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…”96
  • Venezuela 2002
  • Gaza Strip 2006ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…”present
  • Somalia 2006ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…”07
  • Libya 2011

ƒÆ’-¡ Sri Lanka should not just bow down to the ongoing international pressure. Vague allegations and the one-off video by Channel four are meaningless if they are not backed with solid, undisputable proof. Our army succeeded in defeating one of the most ruthless terrorist outfits in the world, a boast which even the USA cannot make claim to in modern times. Those in the international community should first look to correcting the flaws of their own nations before pointing fingers at us.

Regarding a message to the Badu Bala Sena

June 5th, 2013

Mr. Bernard Wijeyasingha Clinton, Louisiana, USA

I would like to lend voice to your organization and address the issue of the proposed building of the Sita Temple and in that vein all Hindu and Muslim houses of worship. I would also like to share my opinion regarding the existing 13th amendment.

ƒÆ’-¡ Regarding the proposed Sita Temple. It would be advisable that if such a structure gets official support then that Hindu Temple including all Hindu temples are open to all Hindus regardless of caste. This is practiced in Hindu Temples built in Western Christian nations and I see no difference that in the world’s oldest Buddhist nation (outside of India) where the Buddha himself denounced the caste system and the UN considers the Caste system an “institutionalized human right violation” it is the duty of any Buddhist Sanga to demand the present government implement regulations that do away with any Caste practices in Sri Lanka. That proposed Sita temple should be not only opened to all Hindus but all people regardless of faith. This should also apply to Mosques which bar the entrance of non Muslims.

ƒÆ’-¡ Regarding the issue of the 13th amendment that must be removed from the new Constitution and in it’s place a new amendment that places the emphasis of the nation’s security and unity over that of the provinces. An amendment that places power in the center with an active role of the Buddhist Sanga would serve the national interest and protect it from any ideations of sessionism brought upon by inside or foreign forces.

ƒÆ’-¡ Thank you in advance for reading my suggestions. I am in full support of the philosophy of your Sanga and see that your order is much needed at this time when TESO has been resurrected in Tamil Nadu, Chief Minister Jayalalithaa is demanding a referendum on the formation of Eelam to New Delhi who is unusually silent on the issue, the new funding of LITE by the Tamil Diaspora and the demand by the Tamil National Association to devolve central power to the Tamil dominated provinces, which to me is a veiled threat towards the full formation of Eelam.

ƒÆ’-¡ Sincerely,

Mr. Bernard Wijeyasingha

Clinton, Louisiana, USA

UPFA MP discloses in parliament:EKNELIGODA ALIVE AND WELL IN FRANCE

June 5th, 2013

Courtesy The Daily News

* Moving in disguise

* Wife blames govt. for disappearance

Ekneligoda

UPFA MP Arundika Fernando yesterday disclosed in parliament that Prageeth Ekneligoda who is said to have disappeared, is living in France. He made this observation in parliament joining the debate on the regulations under the Sri Lanka Press Council Law. He said, ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Ekneligoda is living in disguise in France though the UNP and opposition say that he has disappeared.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬

ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Several persons living in France told me that he is living in France,ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ he said. Arundika Fernando said that he met several media personnel in France who are said to have disappeared. The wife of Prageeth is crying before media but he is living in France. Arundika Fernando further stated that these media personnel have gone abroad with the support of embassies. Their cases are heard in courts in Sri Lanka. Ekneligoda, a journalist cum cartoonist allegedly went missing since January 24, 2010.

His wife Sandya, was one of the anti-government campaigners at the recent UNHRC sessions in Geneva blaming the government for the disappearance of her husband.

Khalifa of Islam explains his recent tours to U.S.A. and Canada.

June 5th, 2013

by A. Abdul Aziz, Press Secretary, Ahmadiyya Muslim JamaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢at ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” Sri Lanka.

ƒÆ’-¡ (Given below is an excerpt of the Friday Sermons of Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad, Supreme Head of the world-wide Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in Islam, delivered on 31st May 2013, at ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”Baithul FuthuhƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢, London, U.K. gave a discourse on his recent tours of U.S.A and Canada.

ƒÆ’-¡ Ahmadiyya Khalifa started his sermon by reciting Quran verse:

ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”And as for the bounty of your Lord do relate it to othersƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢. (93:12) and said:

Bounties of God can be worldly, regarding faith as well as spiritual. Worldly bounties are granted to one and all, across the board. Those who have faith and consider God to be the source of all blessings are also grateful for worldly bounties. While their appreciation of gratefulness is on personal level, they also tell the world that blessings are only from God. Then there are bounties of faith and spiritual bounties. We Ahmadis are the servants of the true and ardent devotee of the Holy Prophet (peace and blessings of Allah be on him), the Promised Messiah (on whom be peace) and we have attained these bounties. It is obligatory on each Ahmadi to relate bounties and blessings of God. One way to do this is to abide by the commandments of God while another way is to announce it to the world, via Tabligh (Preaching) , that come and share this spiritual light that we have be given and become recipients of GodƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s blessings. It is this light of God alone that will facilitate to adorn everyoneƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s worldly life as well as ending.

It is also a manifestation of GodƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s bounties when He graces our meagre efforts and blesses them manifold and beyond our expectations. This again draws our attention to Him. A true believer needs to have a real insight into this subject in order to continue to be a recipient of GodƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s grace. God sent the Promised Messiah (on whom be peace) in this age to spread the message of the Holy Prophet (peace and blessings of Allah be on him). God sent him with His support and corroborative signs which we are witnessing to this day. These corroborations are in accordance with Divine promises for God had foretold the Promised Messiah (on whom be peace) that he would not be able to encompass His bounties. It was revealed to him: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”If you count the favours of God, it will not be possible for you to do so.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ [Tadhkirah, pp. 120 ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬"…" 121 2009 edition] Another revelation stated: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”Keep proclaiming the bounty of your Lord.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢[Tadhkirah, pp. 557 ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬"…" 558]

The Promised Messiah Hazrat Mirza Ghulam Ahmad (on whom be peace) wrote: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”Owing to the commandment ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”And as for the bounty of your Lord do relate it to othersƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ this humble one sees nothing wrong in expressing that merely out of His grace and favour, the Noble and Merciful God has given this humble one a generous measure in all these matters. He did not send this useless one empty-handed and did not appoint him without any signs. On the contrary, all the signs were given which are now materialising and will continue to do so. Until God Almighty manifestly establishes the process of reasoning, He will continue to exhibit these signs. [Translated from ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…"Tafseerul QurƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢an, Vol. VI, p. 649] The Promised Messiah (on whom be peace) also wrote: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”Humility and meeknessƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬¦are essential conditions of Ubudiyyat (devotion of God/being His servant), however, owing to the commandment in the noble verse: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”And as for the bounty of your Lord do relate it to othersƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ it is also extremely necessary to relate Divine bounties.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ [Translated from ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…"Tafseerul QurƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢an, Vol. VI, p. 649]

Whenever we experience grace and blessing of God, we recount and relate it by virtue of the commandment of this verse, as indeed we should. However, this is done with humility rather than as recounting any sense of self-importance.

Ahmadiyya Supreme Head has recently been on a tour of USA and Canada where different programmes were held with outside guests. God enabled to relay the real message of Islam and this message spread on such an extensive level that it proved beyond the expectations of the local JamaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢at. This is a blessing among the blessings of God, and is not due to anyoneƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s efforts.

The JamaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢at was introduced in the West coast of USA by virtue of this tour where Hazrat Khalifatul Masih had not been before. He went to Los Angeles. The city, the area and its Hispanic population and the tasks the JamaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢at there has to undertake were mentioned in a previous Friday sermon. Today Huzoor recounted the introduction of the JamaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢at to outside guests. A reception was organised at a hotel in Los Angeles by the JamaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢at. Management thought that being worldly-minded, perhaps many people would not turn up and till the last day responses were coming in. [Generally speaking] such arrangements are made [in the JamaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢at]on the basis that an estimated number of people are expected to attend from all those who are sent invitations. However, here the response was so huge that it gave cause for concern to the management. In the end, the seating arrangement had to be increased and some friends who had said they would bring along their friends had to be apologised to. The reception was attended by notable section of society where Ahmadiyya Khalifa gave a discourse. He briefly expounded the Quranic term ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”Lord of all the worldsƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ and with reference to it spoke about the love and affection of the Holy Prophet (peace and blessings of Allah be on him) for mankind and explained that his blessed model is an example for us to emulate, how could Islam be an extremist religion? There was a specific impact on the guests as regards the blessed model. Everyone said such a teaching should be disseminated; the world is in need of it.

The reception took place on 11 May 2013 and people belonging to different walks of life attended it. The total number of guests was 251 who liked the teachings of Islam constituting peace, love, respect and justice in the world. Among the guests were 5 members of US Congress, 14 representatives of renowned media, , 27 elected and governmental officials, 37 professors, 13 diplomats, 26 NGO representatives , 29 inter-faith leaders, 20 members of law enforcement, 2 people belonging to think-tanks, 6 members of the armed forces and 36 professionals. Below are some views of the guests.

Barbara Goldberg, founder and director of Wells Bring Hope, said: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”I am writing to express my deep appreciation for inviting us to be part of your welcome lunch for His Holiness. You created a very moving programme, which was not only an expression of respect but also one that conveyed a community that many of us didn’t know much about.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢

Robert Crockett, partner at a prestigious law firm of Latham & Watkins LLP said: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”I thought His Holiness’ explanation of the Qur’an on the issue of war was pretty interesting. He’s willing to tackle the tough issue with non-believers.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ Pete Aguilar, Mayor of Redlands, CA said: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”I wanted to personally thank you for the invitation to join you Saturday to hear His Holiness deliver the message of tolerance and peaceful relations within our world…I was very appreciative to hear the message from His Holiness about the separation of church and stateƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬¦ we need to be aware that many others throughout the world are discriminated against because of their religious beliefsƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬¦I agree with His Holiness that peace cannot be achieved without an end to oppressive viewpoints and cruelty to others. My hope is that through continued education of our young people we can open their eyes to a world of tolerance and appreciation for each other that will lead to a better and more tolerant world.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢

On the one hand there is the USA where proclamations are made against Islam and on the other hand here, the teaching of Islam is being acclaimed.

Honourable Lee Baca, LA County Sheriff, who is very well-known said: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”His Holiness Mirza Masroor Ahmad’s visit to Los Angeles resulted in the message of peace, love and justice to five hundred people of all faiths. The audience consisted of public safety leaders, members of congress, city councils and educators. His Holiness emphasized “Love for all- hatred for none” as the true teaching of the Prophet (peace and blessings be on him). World peace is a responsibility that all faiths can embrace was a common feeling by those in attendance.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢

This indeed is the same country in which many erroneous things were said about Islam and the Holy Prophet (peace and blessings of Allah be on him) and now that the teaching of Islam was taken there, they could not but concur with what was said. May God also give sense to the Muslims that they may establish the beautiful teaching of Islam through their practice.

Honourable Grey Davis, former Governor of California, said: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”I really enjoyed his message of peace, understanding, and respect for all of GodƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s childrenƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬¦ You know, I think that we have to realize that we are all GodƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s children… There is one God, He made us all, and He wanted us to love him and to love our neighbours.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ He sat next to Huzoor and had a good conversation in which he showed great interest in MTA and took its channel frequency saying he will be watching it.

Honourable Eric Garcetti, a member of LA City Council and now LA Mayor Elect ,said: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”His Holiness’ speech described a clear path of brotherly cooperation and respect as the foundation for peace and prosperity in the worldƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬¦[we] wish him all the best in his mission to spread a message of love, empowerment, and tolerance throughout the world.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢

Dana Rohrabacher, US Congressman, said: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”His Holiness today gave a set of remarks that were reaching out to all of us . . . His message of tolerance and love and of accepting one another is important to bind all of us here . . . This was the first time I met him, and I’m impressed by his very academic, thoughtful and logical approach to issues he presented as well as his analysis of the world. He has a message that can be accepted by people of various faiths . . . His message of peace bears listening to — he has a gravitas when he speaks about peace.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢

Rachel Moran, Dean, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Law, said: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”It is an honour and a privilege to be part of such an event that promotes peace and tolerance. We took home an important ethical lesson today, that each of us has a responsibility to seek harmony and build bridges in our everyday lives and in every opportunity. What could be more inspiring than that? ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬¦ His Holiness represents a sense of spirituality and idealism that provides us with an important message in a world that is rife with conflict. He reminds us that peace is a collective obligation and that there is a strong ecumenical part of his kind of thinking and his philosophy that is that regardless of religion we are all objects of love and we all have an obligation to love others.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢

Honourable Mohamed Samir, Consul General of Egypt, said: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”He is a leader of wisdomƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬¦ I was highly inspired but what he said todayƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬¦ his words are very inspiring and I encourage people to cooperate and coexist ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬¦we have to apply his every advice to coexistƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬¦ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢

Sophia Pandya, Professor of Religious Studies, California State University Long Beach, said: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”I particularly enjoyed His Holiness’ comments on world peace and love of all humanity. The world needs more humanitarian points of light such as the Ahmadiyya movement.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢

Aziza Hasan, a former Director of Government Relations of Muslim Public Affairs Council, a very prominent American Muslim organization, said: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”Congratulations on an incredible event this last Saturday. I walked away refreshed and energized as both an Inter-faith professional and Muslim community member. His Holiness was eloquent and relevant. I really appreciated that he tackled violence accusations against the Prophet Mohammad (peace and God’s blessings upon him). Many people try to avoid or dance around the issue. His remarks addressed them head on to a distinguished audience with a great number of followers.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢

John McMahon, from San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department, said: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”The message was on point and we all agree that working together towards peace is the direction we need to travel.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢

Dr Frank Leivo, a distinguished physician, said: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”His Holiness represents a denomination that I have had limited exposure to and yet his words fit my religious philosophy perfectly…every word emanating from his lips was truth. His goal of world peace and his timely warnings of nuclear war are words that our leaders need to hear and heed.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢

Revered Jan Chase said: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”I’m grateful for this opportunity to meet His Holiness and to attend this grand gathering. I particularly liked that fact that he addressed the subject of terrorism so directly in his remarks.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢

Dana Rohrabacher is a Republican Congressman whose views are usually seen as anti-Islamic. He had remarked after the Boston bombing that Islam incites children to kill and it is a danger to the world today. His comments after attending the reception at LA have been cited above. Later, he sent a letter to our director of Public Affairs (external affairs) in US and wrote: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”His Holiness should enjoy a sense of accomplishment that his visit to Southern California planted some seeds that will reap goodness of heart for years to come.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ Thus was the change brought about to his viewpoint after Ahmadiyya HeadƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s ƒÆ’-¡ tour!

Ahmadiyya Khalifa was interviewed by LA Times. Below is the published version of the interview:

Q: How do you spread the message of Islam as a religion of peace in the circumstances you find in the United States where, because of terrorist attacks by Muslim extremists, some people harbour misconceptions about the nature of Islam?

A: Muslims have been persecuted and attacked by their opponents throughout history, and have found themselves at war, compelled to retaliate for the mistreatment. But there is now no such religious war. Whenever any jihadist organization stands up in the name of Islam and misconstrues its true teachings, we have to stand up to this and speak out. Not only in the United States but everywhere in the world you see the name of Islam being defamed by opponents, those who donƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢t have a true understanding of Islam. These are militant groups, not followers of the true religion, and we always stand against them.

Here in the United States, we have a program of good works. For the past two years we have been conducting the ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Muslims for LifeƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ campaign. We organize the donation of blood. The first time this drive was conducted we collected 10,000 blood donations and distributed them to hospitals.

Q: Your community is committed to separation of church and state, which is a distinction from some Muslim-majority countries in the Middle East where political leaders are trying to establish Islamic governments in the place of the authoritarian regimes ousted in the Arab Spring revolutions. Would the region be more stable, in your opinion, if new secular governments were created instead?

A: In Egypt, what we have seen after having removed Hosni Mubarak is that nothing has changed. We have a government that still doesnƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢t discharge its duties to the public and isnƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢t respecting the rights of the people. In Libya, every tribe has its own government. The defence minister warned recently that some are attempting to overthrow the elected government and that unless some steps are taken there will be another disaster. In Tunisia, everyone says they are changing the country for the best and in the name of religion, but there is no peace. If there is going to be true democracy in the region it has to be practiced as in the West [without religious domination].

Q: How does the international community go about restoring peace in the region now racked by war and violent opposition?

A: A few months back, President Shimon Peres of Israel said the United Nations should send forces into these disrupted countries, but only forces comprised of Arab soldiers, not Western troops. It is the proper role of neighbours to get together and try to stop the conflicts in their region. ItƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s the duty of neighbouring countries to stop the atrocities in Syria.

Q: How do you imagine the fighting in Syria could be brought to an end?

A: The government of Syria is predominantly Alawite, while the majority of Syrians are Sunnis. The government mistreated Sunnis and created inequality. Now there are others with vested interests coming into the country, including extremists, to help the rebels. So there is now conflict among the rebels as well as with the government. The atrocities and persecution were started by the government, but now both parties are guilty. They wonƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢t resolve it themselves, so there should be some initiative to find a way out and bring an end to the fighting.

Q: You say it is the responsibility of neighbouring countries to help find a path to peace. Do you see the efforts recently announced by Russia and the United States to bring the Syrian parties together in negotiations as a desirable response by neighbours, or are these powers too far removed from the region?

A: The world is now a global village, so the idea of neighbourhood is broader. But there are still two blocs in the world, with Russia supporting the Syrian government and Western governments supporting the rebels. It will be a test of the goodwill of the United States and Russia to stop the violence there. It must be stopped, because if it continues it will draw in the whole world.

Q: The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community leadership has been driven from Pakistan into exile. What is at the root of your differences with other Muslims, and how does the rift affect the cohesion and unity of Islam’s message?

A: We believe that the Messiah has come as a subordinate, non-law-bearing prophet in the person of the founder of Ahmadiyya Muslim Community [in 1889]. Other Muslims disagree and believe after the Holy Prophet of Islam comes, there can be no other prophet, either one bearing a new law or not.

In Pakistan, the regime has passed a law against Ahmadis, saying we are not Muslims for the purposes of law and the constitution. The Ahmadis number in the millions, not only in Pakistan. But there you can see it was the fear of Pakistani mullahs that if they did not stop the Ahmadis from freely practicing their religion, the Ahmadis might attract every Pakistani Muslim into their fold.

Q: Where is the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community strongest in the world, and where is it growing fastest?

A: We have millions of followers in Asia, but the following is increasing fastest in West Africa. Pakistan used to be the biggest Ahmadi community, but now certain African countries have greater numbers. We are increasing day by day, every year by 100,000s.

Some people are afraid of Islam. Some people have become indifferent to all religions. They donƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢t believe in any God. But after a certain period they will come back and find religion. When they reach this state, we believe and we hope that we will help people fill this spiritual gap with the true teachings of our religion.

Hazrat Khalifatul Masih said most of the time a lot is not reported in interviews but LA Times published a good account of the interview. Huzoor had told the correspondent that if their current generation is not inclined to Ahmadiyyat, InshaAllah the next one will be and Ahmadiyyat will fill the spiritual vacuum that is felt by many.

Hazrat Khalifatul Masih was also interviewed by Wall Street Journal, a high-brow newspaper with an international circulation. The correspondent asked why Ahmadiyya Khalifa was visiting California? He responded by saying that the entire Earth is ours and we have to take our message everywhere. Besides, he was there to meet members of his JamaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢at. Perhaps this question stemmed from a preconception based on politicians visiting USA to make worldly gains. Ahmadiyya HeadƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s response was that he was there neither to seek anything for himself nor for his JamaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢at. He said: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”The only gain I want from [U.S. leaders] is to make some programme to create and develop peace in the world.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ He also warned against an impending world war if necessary steps were not taken and brought up the issue of drone strikes causing loss of innocent lives and said that these drone attacks are increasing anti-West sentiments!

Through the coverage of the tour by LA Times, Wall Street Journal, Chicago Tribune and few other newspapers in print media, the message reached 5.5 million people whereas it reached 5 million people via online sites and 1.5 million people through radio broadcasts. This could have never come to pass through our efforts. Indeed, all this was from God and was a brief glimpse of His omnipotence. Now, all these JamaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ats need to reap benefit from this and take the task onwards and upwards.

Next stop on the tour was Vancouver, Canada where Baitur Rahman mosque was inaugurated. Outside guests were invited and the event received good coverage by the media. On the whole, in Canada our message reached 8.5 million people through the mosque inauguration and through various interviews of Ahmadiyya Khalifa. CBC a national channel like the BBC here reported the mosque inauguration watched by an estimated 1 million viewers. Over 2 million viewers got the message via CTV, a news channel whereas 600,000 viewers received the message through Global TV. Eleven newspapers covered the event. Radio stations also broadcasted it and in particular the radio stations of the ethnic media relayed the message to 600,000 listeners.

Manmeet Singh is an old friend of the JamaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢at, he is a minister in the provisional assembly of Alberta. He said that he had prepared text for a speech on peace that he has to deliver in Geneva. However, after listening to the address of Ahmadiyya Khalifa, he said he would revise the text of his speech and include some points raised by Huzoor. A representative of a radio station called ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”Sher e PunjabƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ said that he found the address very courageous. Another comment praised HuzoorƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s remark in his address that when we inaugurate a new mosque, we initiate a new chapter of religious freedom. CBC correspondent reported in news that Ahmadiyya Head replied satisfactorily to all the questions. A business man remarked that he had found out at the inauguration that peace is not only a teaching in Christianity. He said he would relate this to his children. A Muslim from Morocco said that he hoped this promotion of message of peace will help counter the misconceptions about Islam as an extremist religion. He said he was a Muslim but had learned many new things from the address. Another guest said that the address was extremely thought-provoking and encompassing wide range of matters. The highlight of the address was that it dealt with the fears of the ordinary person. It was extremely lucid and carried foresight. Another guest said that the message of Tawheed (Oneness of God) in the address was significant for the world.

Thus, different media outlets played a role in broadcasting this message. It reached about 4% of the population of USA, although in terms of West Coast population it reached 25%. In Canada the message reached 25% of total Canadian population. This was merely by the grace of God.

With the grace of God, according to a cautious estimate more than 20 million people received the message of Ahamdiyyat true Islam in this north American tour of Ahmadiyya Khalifa. To spread the message on such a scale and then to have positive, supportive responses cannot come to pass with human endeavour. This is from God.

The full English Translation of the Sermon ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” the video link of which is as below:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i8dtD0hOmLs&feature=youtu.be

Vesak Concert at UNESCO brings together Asian community

June 5th, 2013

Permanent Delegation of Sri Lanka to UNESCO Paris

The eve of Vesak was ushered in at UNESCO, with a colourful and vibrant concert of dance, song and music bringing together countries from across the Asian region and also including artistes from Europe, in an expression of unity as the true meaning of Vesak, the message of the Buddha and the relevance of such teachings were highlighted and conveyed.

ƒÆ’-¡ Commencing the evening, Sri Lankan dancers performed an exquisite ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”pooja danceƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ invoking blessings and ushering in a whole host of dancers, singers, and musicians. Several other Sri Lankan dance items were also presented showcasing the different traditional dance forms found in the country.

unescoparis1

ƒÆ’-¡ The Permanent Delegations of India, China, Thailand and Indonesia joined the Permanent Delegation of Sri Lanka in making this evening possible with a duo from an Indian Dance School in Paris performing the legendary ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”bharatha natyamƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ in two parts, while a Chinese dancer rendered a beautiful historic dance piece. From Thailand, dancers brought to life two dance routines known as ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”Ram Chern Pra KwanƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ and ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”Ra-bam Ma-Terng Mei JerngƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ while Indonesia provided the traditional Balinese ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”Legong Kraton Lasem-Condong DanceƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢

unescoparis2

ƒÆ’-¡ Providing music, a special sitar performance was followed by the singing of traditional Vesak ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”Bakthi GeethaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ and other patriotic songs from Sri Lanka by Sri Lankans and also by a Swiss dental surgeon.

ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”Queen of the ScreenƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ and Member of Parliament, the Hon. Malani Fonseka, who was in Paris to attend the many events organized to commemorate Vesak, met with the artistes at the end of the concert and presented them with tokens of appreciation, in the company of the newly appointed Ambassador and Permanent Delegate of Sri Lanka, Prof. Karunaratne Hangawatte.

unescoparis3

ƒÆ’-¡ A large gathering of religious leaders, Ambassadors, diplomats, members of the Sri Lankan and other Asian communities in France filled the main hall of UNESCO for an evening of deeper understanding and appreciation of Sri Lankan and Asian artistic expressions.

 

 

Religious rituals conducted at the Embassy of Sri Lanka and at UNESCO in Paris for Vesak

June 5th, 2013

Permanent Delegation of Sri Lanka to UNESCO Paris

Events to mark Vesak in France commenced with a special ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”pirithƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ ceremony at the Embassy of Sri Lanka in Paris which was attended by senior members of the Maha Sangha, including the Ven. Master Chin Kung, Head and Founder of Pureland College, Australia and Ven. Dr Bodagama Chandima Thero, International Affairs Advisor to His Excellency the President of Sri Lanka.

Pinkama at the Embassy_VEsak2013_small

Upon being received by the newly appointed Ambassador and Permanent Delegate to UNESCO, Professor Karunaratne Hangawatte, the senior Buddhist monks made offerings and conducted a special ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”pirithƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ ceremony which was also attended by the Hon. Chamal Rajapaksa, Speaker of the Parliament, Hon. Malani Fonseka, Member of Parliament, Ambassador Katalin Bogyay, President of the General Conference of UNESCO and other Ambassadors and Permanent Delegates from UNESCO.

Blessings were given to the many events being organized in France, especially at UNESCO to mark the three fold manifestation in the life and times of the Buddha.

Offering Dana_VESAK_samll 2013

ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”DanaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ was offered to large number of members of the Maha Sangha at UNESCO on both the day before Vesak and on Vesak day itself.

The Chief Sangha Nayake of France, Ven. Parawahera Chandraratne Thero,ƒÆ’-¡  Adikarana Sangha Nayake Ven. Murungasyaye Gnanissara Thero as well as the Ven. Kongasdeniye Ananda Thero were amongƒÆ’-¡  the senior members of the Maha Sangha who were joined by several other Buddhist monks who were visiting France from Sri Lanka, Asia and Europe.

Vesak at UNESCO_small

On Vesak day, events commenced with a special session of prayers for peace and harmony, which was conducted at UNESCO. A large number of members of the Maha Sangha representing the different sects of Buddhism chanted ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”pirithƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢.ƒÆ’-¡  These members of the clergy included Venerable monks from Sri Lanka, France and across Asia. The religious observances also included special prayers by Hindu, Christian and Islamic clerics.

 

 

 

If India remained Buddhist (the greatest ‘might have beens’ of history)

June 5th, 2013

SIR J. C. COYAJEE, B.A., LL.B. Department of History, Economics and Politics, Andhra University, India

In this account of the antecedents of the League of Nations it has not been found possible to take any account of the religious and philosophical influences which have always preached a world organization for peace and progress. Such a study would occupy a course of lectures by itself. On the West there was the teaching of Pierre Dubois, of Dante, of Erasmus and Kaait, of William Penn and Saint Pierre-* In the East a great effort had been made by Buddhism long ago to unite the world into a pacifist whole.

It is well known how the great Asoka pro- claimed all over his empire his inscriptions that ‘the chief conquest is the conquest of piety’. He also begged his descendants to rid themselves of the popular notion that conquest by arms is the duty of the kings; and even if they should find themselves engaged in warfare he reminds them they might still find pleasure in patience and gentleness, and should regard as the only true conquest that which is effected through the law of piety or Duty.

Less realised hitherto by the public has been the influence of Buddhism for peace when it left its native country and crossing the Himalayas established itself in Tibet and Mongolia.

Mongolia which had in former times sent forth one swarm of invaders after another, to plague the world from the Altais to the Atlantic Ocean, has been made into one of the most pacific countries in the world thanks to the pacifying-genius of Buddhism ; and if the Mongolians still retain some of the martial ardour of their ancestors it is expended in the harmless contests of the wrestling ring.

The aura of peace which radiates today from Geneva (1932) has flowed for centuries from centres like Lahasa and Nalanda; and as the missionaries of peace now go in crowds across the Alps to Geneva so they crowded once across the Himalayas.

It is a pleasure to find that at least one work on the League of Nations pays a tribute to Buddha as the greatest, ( *Ct Jones & Sherman, League of Nations, from Idea to Reality, pp. 4550), and, in some respects, the earliest forerunner of the cause of world peace; for it speaks of Buddhism as the greatest movement towards world-peace that the history of religion records.*

It is quite conceivable that the history of the world might have-been changed greatly for the better, and much of the present development might have been anticipated, had India chosen to remain as a country in the fold of the Buddha.

For then India could have been the nucleus and focus of a great religious and political system stretching not only over China, further India and Ceylon but over Central Asia and Ceylon. That would have formed a great system dominated by pacific ideals, and such ideas could have had a splendid chance of spreading over Western Asia and of permeating the entire world. We are face to face here with one of the greatest “might have beens” of history.

Nor when talking of religions would it be at all just not to mention that system of the founder of which the first dictum was “blessed are the peace-makers”. Nor should we forget the system of Zoroaster which boasted of being “the religion which makes men lay down their arms”.

Extracted from a paper entitled

‘INDIA AND THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS’

by

SIR J. C. COYAJEE, B.A., LL.B.
Department of History, Economics and Politics, Andhra University, India

DubaiƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s Fakih Group ups Sri Lanka intake

June 5th, 2013

PRESS COMMUNIQUE ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” MINISTRY OF INDUSTRY & COMMERCE, SRI LANKA

ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” JUNE 04, 2013

[Now shipping $200,000 of souvenirs monthly from Sri Lanka ƒÆ’-¡ 

  • ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”Prime space for Lanka in new $85 Mn Dubai souvenir showpieceƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢-Fakih
  • Made in Sri Lanka brand wows ME & Vietnamese buyers

sales2

N.P Fakih, the Managing Director of Dubai based $345 Mn (Y2012) Fakih Group, on 03 June at the

Ministry of Industry and Commerce, shows the layout of Sri Lanka stalls in his GroupƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s new

$85 Mn Dubai Showroom named as ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Antique Museum HandicraftƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ scheduled to be completed

by end-2014.

ƒÆ’-¡ The Dubai based souvenirs and handicraft multinational Fakih Collection- a leading global souvenir firm-is increasing its direct sourcing from Sri Lanka. ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Made in Sri Lanka handicrafts are beginning to make an impression among our buyers in DubaiƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s Jumeira Shopping mall and Karama Market, and also in several Qatari, Bahrain and Abudhabi malls. We have already expanded our Sri Lankan craft-making supply chain to 2000 householdsƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ said N.P Fakih, the Managing Director of Dubai based $345 Mn ƒÆ’-¡ (Y2012) Fakih Group on 03 June in Colombo.

Fakih is in town to identify new handicraft supply sources from Sri Lanka as well as to inspect his firmƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s on-going souvenir and handicraft making in Kandy and Elpitiya. ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-We are now hunting for additional other villages who can supply us. ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”Made in Sri LankaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ eco-friendly souvenirs are a hit in in DubaiƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s Jumeira Shopping mall, Karama Market, and also in several Qatar, Bahrain and Abudhabi malls. I am happy to say that on average, we are now buying almost $ 200,000 valued items from Sri Lanka on monthly basis. The two main international markets buying Lankan handicrafts are Vietnam and the Middle East. Middle Eastern shoppers snap up most souvenir types made in Sri Lanka including wood based items while Vietnam market mostly prefers paper and newspaper based items-such as our eco-friendly pencils made from newspapers. We have already expanded our Sri Lankan supply chain to 2000 craft-making households -200 are making paper products, 500 families in palm and similar grass based (or strong ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”IlukƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ leaves) products, 200 in bamboo products and 1100 families doing part assembly of eco-friendly handy crafts. Most households are earning around Rs 20000 per month by supplying to usƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ said Fakih, and added: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-In March 2013, Fakih Group was certified as Our Sri Lankan product line will a prime attraction in my up-coming $ 85 Mn showpiece to be constructed at Street 19 in the vicinity of Times Square in Dubai. This 175,000 Sqr Ft huge showroom to be completed by 2014 end, will showcase souvenirs coming to us from various international locations. The biggest three sections have been allocated to Thailand, Sri Lanka and Vietnam. We have already allocated sub-sections 29, 92 and 101 exclusively for Sri Lanka with a total area of 18,000 Sqr ft.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬

Fakih Group employs 6700 employees across 14 countries including Sri Lanka (considerable number of them being women in households on a self-employment basis) supplying to the growing demand volumes in their 28 international markets. The Group uses kiosk vending model and runs 28 kiosks in Dubai alone. Among the 6700 employees are 3850 handicraft creators (craftsmen). Among the countries supplying the more than 290,000 items strong Fakih Group multicultural gifts and souvenirs portfolio are Sri Lanka (722 items), UAE (467 items), Philippines (3600 items), Thailand (22467 items), Vietnam (11359 items), Turkey (1310 items), Morocco (12290 items), Nepal (2315 items), Cambodia (1310 items), African collection (3590 items), Indonesia (11274 items), India (55924 items), Egypt (1936 items), Yemen (3600 items) and China (160128 items).

ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-My target is to increase current 722 items from Sri Lanka to 5000 items in the next three years. Our Group turnover has grown to $ 345 Mn (YƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢12) from $ 300 Mn in 2011ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ Fakih added.

CONCLUDED

Media

Ministry of Industry & Commerce ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” 112435847 (Ext 246)

The Dangers Of The 13th Amendment Seems To Be Oblivious To Some Pundits.

June 4th, 2013

Insight By Sunil Kumar

JuneƒÆ’-¡ 5th 2013

There seems to be a sudden surge on the part of certain Sri Lankan policy makers to implement the 13th Amendment to the Constitution perhaps oblivious to the dangers it could entail and precipitate a complete reversal of roles in the aftermath of a decades long victorious battle with the Tamil TigerƒÆ’-¡ insurgent who long sought to destroy what Sri Lanka realistically stood for, the significance of how the Nation evolved through millenia and who controls its functioning on the pretext that the land belonged to those whom they saw fit which of course does not align with reality as justice prevailed in the end where the greater as well as more deserving were victorious. Let this not be compromised!

Neither India norƒÆ’-¡  disgruntled Tamil Tiger supportive diaspora and definitelty not forces who would like to interfere into the internal affairs of a Sovereign Democratic Majority Sinhala Nation have any right to do soƒÆ’-¡ simply to appease agendas of their own involving Sri Lanka’s adversaries who appear to be beneficial towards their own ends whose duplicitous and contentious presentationsƒÆ’-¡  provide the sensationalism intended to sway a myopic world on matters related to Sri Lanka.

At this stage of Sri Lanka’s progress in the aftermath of the victory over terrorism and insurgency the term Unitary State needs to be the foremost consideration firmly disassociated with the term Secession towards appeasing a miniscule minority and their supportives reluctant to toe the line with the Administration andƒÆ’-¡ now screaming for the 13th AmendmentƒÆ’-¡ where logically as well as rationally it is not the panacea Sri Lanka needs towards stability andƒÆ’-¡  development where to the contrary it could set in place dangerous precedents that were dismantled as a result of the downing of the insurgents and something a few blinkered pundits fail to see as they continue harping over the somewhat contentious merits of the 13th Amendment.

The following excerpt ofƒÆ’-¡  a presentation by SPUR the Human Rights Organization based in Australia does more than pellucidate the ramifications of the 13th AmendmentƒÆ’-¡  and a worthwhile warning towards its implementation where a truer statement would perhaps be never more applicable which hopefully will be picked up for its merit towards the Nation of Sri Lanka by her legislators and Administrators. It is a brilliant evaluation of what the Nation of Sri Lanka truly needs today.

with all due credits and acknowledgements to SPUR

Repeal the 13th Amendment to Sri Lanka Constitution

Protect Unitary Status ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” Defuse Racism

The Society for peace Unity and Human Rights (SPUR) is a 16 year old human rights organisation operating in Australia, dedicated to protecting the unitary status and the territorial integrity of Sri Lanka.ƒÆ’-¡  We have been active in countering denigration of ƒÆ’-¡ Sri Lanka and challenging the spread of malicious misinformation. During the last 16 years, SPUR has been urging the Sri Lankan Government, including President RajapaksaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s government to repeal the 13th Amendment to Sri LankaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s constitution. The 13th Amendment, rammed down Sri LankaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s throat in 1987 by then unfriendly India:

  • Risks Balkanising unitary Sri Lanka providing a fertile ground for separatism parroted by political parties such as the TNA
  • Encourages racist, political activism similar to what is being practiced by the Sri Lanka Muslim Congress during the recently concluded Eastern Provincial Council elections
  • Provides opportunities for foreign funded NGOƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s such as the Centre for Policy Alternative to boldly challenge and obstruct the implementation of progressive government policy such as the Divineguma Bill, drafted to benefit the poor
  • Discourages the cultivation of a ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-one Sri LankaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ culture by encouraging provincial based, racist parochialism freely practiced by the likes of the TNA and the SLMC
  • Threatens national unity by giving minority political parties disproportionate power, allowing them to secure racial based programmes
  • Allows external interference in Sri LankaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s domestic governance evidenced by TNAƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s frequent visits to India, using Tamil Nadu as the ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”Trojan HorseƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ to follow their racist and divisive Eealm agenda.

All Sri Lankans paid a tremendous economic, social and environmental price for eradicating Tamil Tiger Terrorism from Sri Lanka. It is time to expunge the provincial council based on parochial racism from Sri Lanka. We urge President RajapksaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s government to:

  • Repeal the 13 Amendment.
  • Consider establishing village and district based, development centric institutional structure with elected representatives to empower decision making at grass-root level.
  • Get rid of the number of politicians populating a bloated four-tier governance arrangement in Sri Lanka, draining the public purse.

With the repealing of the 13th Amendment, Sri Lanka will prosper as a Unitary State where people will live as one enjoying the full gamut of human rights equitably. At present, the toxic 13th amendment provides a safe heaven and a camouflage for separatists, racists and international agents to freely prosecute their agenda to Balkanise Sri Lanka.

Its time to once and for all to extricate ourselves from the political handcuffs put on us by the Indians nearly 25 years ago.

LETƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢S CALL A SPADE A SPADE AND CALL DR. JAYALATH JAYAWARDENA A TRAITOR

June 4th, 2013

Malin Abeyatunge

ItƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s not the right thing to speak ill of a dead person. But with reluctance, I ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”ll have to break those ethics and call deceasedƒÆ’-¡  Dr. Jayalath JayewardenaƒÆ’-¡  as aƒÆ’-¡  Traitor to Sinhala Buddhists and to Sri Lanka. I fully endorse Malith EkanayakaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s writing on Dr.JJ (Lankaweb) .There are some bunch of Sinhala political and media hypocrites who sang hosannas for JJ knowing well that he acted as a traitor to Sri Lanka. Some of them have completely forgotten how JJ appeased and mollycoddled LTTE and its Diaspora in every opportunity he got on his way. YesterdayƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s Island (3/6/13) carried a big Hosanna by one of the worst tigers livingƒÆ’-¡  Emanuel Pillai crying for Dr.JJ. That itself is enough to brand Dr.JJ ƒÆ’-¡ as a traitor. ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ As Sri Lankans who love their mother country will never forget his utterances against Sri Lanka and Sinhala Buddhists when he was in a foreign soil. He attended many LTTE organised political forums organised GTF and BTF in UK and didnƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢t spare a wink in lambasting Sri Lanka and Sinhala Buddhists.ƒÆ’-¡  When the LTTE was murdering thousands of innocent Sinhalese, Tamils and Muslims this guy was appeasing LTTE. Although Dr.JJ is now dead and gone, the harm he had done to Sinhala Buddhists and Sri Lanka will never be forgotten. I hope Mr. Malith ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Karunananyake will pardon me to reiterate a few instances from his article titled ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-What should I call himƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬¦A TraitorƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ in Lankaweb website:

quote ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬¢ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Chennai, 14 November, (Asiantribune.com): Indian National Congress activists and anti-terrorism groups expressed shock at recent

utterances of the Sri Lankan politician Dr ƒÆ’-¡  Jayalath Jayawardana who urged Indian intervention to save the beleaguered Tamil Tigers in Kilinochchi. They said that Dr JayawardanaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s Press Release issued in New

Delhi stating ƒÆ’-¡  that the Tamils in the north are starving and India should intervene to save them is contrary to the reports issued by UN bodies and various INGOs on the humanitarian situationƒÆ’-¡  (2008)

http://defencecolumn.blogspot.com/2008/11/indian-experts-challenge-jayalath.htmlƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬

ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬¢ QuoteƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬The government will hand over a resolution to Speaker Chamal Rajapaksa on Monday to appoint a Select Committee of Parliament to probe

allegations that United ƒÆ’-¡  National Party (UNP) Member of Parliament Dr. Jayalath Jayawardena colluded with separatist pro-LTTE forces while in

London.

http://www.sundaytimes.lk/101205/News/nws_11.html

ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬¢ Mannar Bishop deprived of meeting LTTE suspects – 31 July 2012

Quote ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬UNP MP Dr. Jayalath Jayawardena yesterday alleged that the dictatorial Rajapaksa regime was denying even the basic right of people to visit those held over terrorismƒÆ’-¡  charges. An irate UNPer said that

Bishop of Mannar Rt. Rev Rayappu Joseph was refused permission last Friday (July 27) to meet 17 LTTE suspects transferred from the Vavuniya prison to Mahara recently following the STF quelling a riot there.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬

 

AT LAST WE ARE MINUS OF ANOTHER SINHALA TRAITOR

WELL ON THE ROAD TO RECONCILIATION -DR CHRIS NONIS TELLS BBC WORLD NEWS

June 4th, 2013

PRESSƒÆ’-¡  RELEASE-The High Commission of Sri Lanka London

Sri Lanka’s post-conflict measures at reconciliation, rehabilitation, reintegration, and reconstruction were highlighted by High Commissioner Dr Chris Nonis during an interview on BBC World News today.

Asked by BBC presenter Mishal Husain what positive developments have occurred in the last four years since the end of the 26 year conflict, Dr Nonis said 297,000 people rescued from the clutches of the LTTE have been rehabilitated, in perhaps the largest hostage rescue operation in global history.

ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-After a 28 year bitter and internecine conflict with the terrorists we finally achieved peace in the country under the leadership of President Mahinda Rajapaksa. There is a billion dollar programme going into the North and East, Negenahira Navodaya, and Uthura Vasanthaya which is building the lives and infrastructure of the people. Eleven thousand six hundred LTTE cadres are now being rehabilitated”, Dr Nonis told the BBC World News programme “Impact”.

“I have met these kids. They were cruelly snatched by Prabhakaran from their parents, and they were fighting but they didn’t know what they were fighting for. It is so wonderful to see them receiving vocational training, being rehabilitated and re-integrated into society,” the High Commissioner said.

On the question of an international independent process to assess progress as called for by the UN, the High Commissioner said that one needs to draw a distinction between an international process and an independent process.

He said ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-We respect the Sovereign rights of Britain, and of every other country, and we expect you to respect ours.ƒÆ’-¡  We are a sovereign and an independent state and naturally we expect the same courtesy that you would expect us to apply for your country.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬

ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-We do have an independent inquiry and many people who initially criticised the LLRC process changed their views when they actually saw the 388-paged document. It was modelled on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of South Africa. It was set within the Principle of International Humanitarian Law, incorporating the Principle of Distinction and the Principle of Proportionality. ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-The Commission is moving forward and there is significant progressƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬.

Questioned on refugees and persecution, Dr Nonis said ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-I would say there are many people who for various different reasons come and seek asylum, and I think what we have to separate, is those who seek asylum as economic refugees,ƒÆ’-¡  from those who seek asylum as political refugeesƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” You must remember the demography of the country, the majority of Tamil people actually live in the Centre and South of Sri Lanka, if you look at Colombo, its roughly a 30-30-30 percent split between Sinhalese, Tamil and Muslim. We have a huge dichotomy or disjuncture in perception between what is portrayed here and the reality of contemporary Sri LankaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬.

Asked by Mishal Husain ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…- How many yearsƒÆ’-¡  would it take to say that we are now reconciledƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬, Dr Nonis pointed to South Africa and the post-apartheid period where there are still substantial issues and to Northern Ireland where, despite the “Good Friday” Agreement, there are still issues.ƒÆ’-¡  “In comparison, I think we have done pretty well,” he said reiterating that it is only four years since the military defeat of the LTTE.

BBC Web Link ( Video ): http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-22754678

03 June 2013

Self Immolation by Bowatte Indraratana Thera – Will it be successful?

June 4th, 2013

Michelle Alexander

ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-As he burned he never moved a muscle, never uttered a sound, his outward composure in sharp contrast to the wailing people around him.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬

Journalist David Halberstam describes the death of ThƒÆ’†’­ch QuƒÆ’†’ ng ƒÆ’-¾ƒÆ’†’ºc, the Vietnamese Buddhist monk who set himself on fire in Saigon in 1963.ƒÆ’-¡ ThƒÆ’†’­ch QuƒÆ’†’ ng ƒÆ’-¾ƒÆ’†’ºcƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s self-immolation triggered a massive response, which resulted in the toppling of the NgƒÆ’†’´ ƒÆ’-¾ƒÆ’†’¬nh Diem regime in South Vietnam.

Self-Immolation as a means of protest leaves a profound and compelling impact, yet it is wrong to assume that every act of self-immolation guarantees change.ƒÆ’-¡  Michael Biggs, one of the few sociologists who have studied this phenomenon estimates that from 1963, 800-3000 self-immolations may have taken place.ƒÆ’-¡  However, not all have been successful. For example, since 2009 fifty-one Tibetan Buddhist monks and nuns have committed self-immolation, yet they have not caused any significant political changes, nor have they brought Tibet any closer to being free of China. Self-immolation may become ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-successfulƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ in a sense where it is not about the one who performs it, but about the community in which it occurs. In such a situation, this community recognizes itself in the predicament of the one committing self-immolation and is, for a lack of a better description, ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-shamedƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ by the event and is then compelled to act.

On May 24th, Bowatte Indraratana Thera committed self-immolation to protest the slaughter of cattle, to succumb to his injuries a few days later. The question arises is this, will it be successful? If the past is any indicator, there will be protests, lawmakers will contemplate implementing laws to abolish cattle slaughter (ex. The Animal Welfare Bill), etc. But, at the end of the day, this too runs the risk of being swept under the carpet and forgotten, much like every other unresolved issue facing our country. It will only work if the people continue to agitate the government to make the necessary changes.

Response to Dr Dayan JayatillekaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s articles (2) about the 13th Amendment

June 3rd, 2013

Chanaka Bandarage, Sri Lanka Support Group

1.Reference to Dr Dayan JayathillakeƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s article on ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Provincial Devolution Through 13th Amendment is a Political Solution Grudgingly Acceptable to both Sinhala and Tamil CommunitiesƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ that appeared in ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”dbsjeyaraj.comƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ on 24 May 2013;ƒÆ’-¡  Dr Jayathillake makes a desperate attempt to justify the preservation of the 13th amendment.ƒÆ’-¡  Therein, he makes a number of arguments.

One argument by Dr Jayathillake is that we should keep the 13th amendment because IndiaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s External Affairs Ministry had indicated to Sri Lanka that if we abolish 13, the Government of Sri Lanka would be ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-at its own riskƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ and would force the New Delhi Government to react with ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-firm measures.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ They have also cautioned that Sri Lanka would be isolating itself in the international community.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ Mr Jayathillake seems to agree with IndiaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s position.

India has to be more specific as to what these ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”firm measuresƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ would be.ƒÆ’-¡  Whether or not Sri Lanka would be isolated from the international community, it is an internal matter for Sri Lanka, unless India says it as a threat. By twice voting against Sri Lanka in Geneva, India has already tried to internationally isolate Sri Lanka.

It is the role of Sri LankaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s External Affairs Ministry to articulate to India the dangers of the 13th amendment, and how it can lead to formation of the Tamil Eelam (see our Media Releases/Petition to His Excellency the President); in any case the issue whether the 13th amendmentƒÆ’-¡  should be abolished or not is an entirely internal matter that should be decided by the people ofƒÆ’-¡  Sri Lanka. Sri Lanka did not put India under undue pressure when its citizens mostly Sri Lankan senior citizens including elderly women on pilgrimage and the countryƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s venerated Buddhist monks were publicly humiliated and severely assaulted on the streets of Thamilnadu, for the sole reason of being Sri Lankan. The countryƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s top sportsmen and women are still denied entry into Thamilnadu (India as a Great Country should be ashamed of having such a discriminatory policy on Sri Lanka). India may argue it is a condition in the Indo-Lanka Agreement of 1987 that Sri Lanka creates 9 provincial governments ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” this does not ƒÆ’-¡ mean Sri Lanka should stick with them forever. International treaties between countries are not necessarily permanent. Countries can vary/revoke them by agreement or of their own. ƒÆ’-¡ India will agree under the Accord, it did not fulfill its side of the bargain; the IPKF failed to disarm the LTTE (IPKF committed many atrocities on Tamil civilians also); LTTE was defeated by the Sri Lankan forces, more than 20 years after the IPKF left the country. These are valid reasons for Sri Lanka to get out of the Agreement if it is still valid (doubtful). I hope Dr Jayatilleka would agree India has not shown proper leadership in relation to Sri Lanka. Her foreign policy on Sri Lanka had been largely dictated by anti-Sri Lanka events in Thamilnadu (an ex-Indian Foreign Affairs chief, Mr Kanwal Sibal, criticised India for this). India is the only Asian country with South Korea that voted against Sri Lanka in Geneva in 2013 ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” even the pro-western Japan abstained from voting (India ƒÆ’-¡ did the same in 2012); in 2013 India first advocated a softer Resolution being implemented against Sri Lanka, within weeks her position dramatically changed (due to Thamilnadu factor), India wanted stringent Resolutions made against Sri Lanka (US objected to this). In a situation like this, it is prudent for Sri Lanka to adopt its own measures of safeguarding its sovereignty and territorial integrity, the number 1 priority for any country.

Dr Jayatilleka tries to compare Sri Lanka with former Yugoslavia. Like India (prior to British colonisation, India was not One Country ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” Thamilnadu itself was an independent entity), prior to World War 2, the former Yugoslavian states were independent entities (eg. Yugoslavia, Croatia, Bosnia etc). But, Sri Lanka has always been One Country. There has never been an Eelam in Sri Lanka. Pandya, Chola, Elara were South Indian invaders who were chased away by brave Sinhalese armies. Where an independent nation is consisted of a number of former sovereign states, it is possible for that nation to disintegrate at some point of time (like the former USSR); this theory will not apply to Sri Lanka.

Dr Jayathiallke talks about R2P (ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”Responsibility to Protect). He is wrong to say this doctrine existed in 1987. R2P is a recent development of customoary international law; ƒÆ’-¡ the main proponent being Gareth Evans, former Australian Foreign Minister. He emphasised that the world should have intervened in Rwanda to save hundreds and thousands of people (R2P has only been somewhat successfully applied in Libya, to overthrow Gadhafi. The 2nd invasion of Iraq was not UN sanctioned).ƒÆ’-¡  In Sri Lanka the Tamils do not face a Rwanda/Libya situation. The UN has failed to apply R2P to Syria (Russia has repeatedly blocked the move in the Security Council).

2. Dr Jayathiallke states the following in his interview with ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”Sunday LakbimaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ (2 June 2013):

ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶©ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡, ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯?

ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‘. ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶« ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ . ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·. ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‘. ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·. ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶», ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‘.
ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶©ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‘. ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ¶¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶­ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‘. ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬.
ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶« ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·. ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ , 2001 ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·. ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ . ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶« ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‘.

Dr Jayatilleka, the Great Proponent of the 13th Amendment, ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ himself admits that there is a danger in holdingƒÆ’-¡  the Northern Provincial Council election! HisƒÆ’-¡  argument is twofold: (i) there is a higher danger to the country if the provincial council election is not held, (ii)ƒÆ’-¡  to safeguard democracy the election must be held. In our Media Releases and Petition to His Excellency the President, we have shown that holding of the election is more dangerous than not holding of it. Let us briefly analyse this again:

Advantages of holding of the September election

  1. ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡  I.ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡  Prima facie, it is a good act. People in the South who are non-racist have articulated they do not mind having a Northern Provincial Council (of course governed by Tamils), provided that it will not discriminate against them, and it will operate in consistent with the Constitution. Like the other 8 provincial councils, the Southerners want the Northern Provincial Council not to do anything that is detrimental to the countryƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s sovereignty and territorial integrity.
  2. ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡  II.ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡  It is good for ethnic harmony.
  3. The Government may get credit from the international community for holding the election as promised.
  4. CHOGM can be successfully conducted in Sri Lanka without a major distraction.

Disadvantage of holding of the election in September

  1. ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡  I.ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡  TNA being the former LTTE proxy in the Parliament will win the election. They have not given up the demand for a separate state. In Geneva in February 2013 they lobbied for the TamilsƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ right for self-determination (ie, a separate state). Last April in London, they lobbied against CHOGM being held in Sri Lanka. It was only 2 days ago (2 June 2013) where the TNA General Secretary, Mavai Senathirajah MP stated in Jaffna (presumably in Tamil) that ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-the TNA does not believe in a power sharing arrangement under a unitary state.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ (3 June 2013: Daily Mirror). There are other TNA MPs who have made similar remarks. In such an environment how can the Nation agree to give the administration of the Northern Provincial Council to a group that is actively advocating secession?
  2. ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡  II.ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡  The chances of another Eelam war being erupted in the North are much higher if the administration in the North is in the hands of the TNA or a similar separatist group.ƒÆ’-¡  Especially if the TNA led provincial government holds Police powers (Varthrajah Permual used it as the provincial ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”ArmyƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢), the consequences could be devastating. Inevitably, there will be clashes between the weapons bearing TNA Police and the Sri Lanka Army. No decent Sri Lankan wants to go back to war.
  3. A TNA led provincial government with Land Power, will never allow the displaced Sinhalese (abut 25,000) to return to the North. According to an eye witness, the TNA MP Mr Suresh Premachandran had recently threatened the Sinhalese who are resettled in Navatkuli Village near Jaffna that they must return to ƒÆ’-¡ the South. These Sinhalese families who speak fluent Tamil have lived in the North for several generations. They now live in utmost fear not knowing what will happen to them after the Northern Provincial Council election. There are similar Sinhalese colonies in the North ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” Mamaduwa, Welioya, Janakapura, Sinahapura to name a few. ƒÆ’-¡ Like what the LTE did to them, would the TNA with Land Power, force them out of North after the election? Would India or the US speak on behalf of them? Any reasonable person would provide the answers ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”YesƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ and ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”NoƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ to them respectively.

Once formed, the TNA Northern Provincial Government will cunningly team up with the west and India (they will hoodwink them also) and will achieve their ultimate objective – the Tamil Eelam. It is foolish to think just because the Government conducted the Northern election or did other good deeds for Northern/Eastern Tamils (the Government has done many good deeds), the west and India will take the side of the Government or praise the Government.ƒÆ’-¡  Like in the past, the good deeds will soon be forgotten (the country has not been given due credit for the prompt resettlement of the IDPS (300,000), release of 10,000 LTTE cadres back into society, allowing/facilitating more than 200,000 Northern Tamils to migrate to the South in the past decade and the massive development work undertaken in the North and East). Like how the US will always protect Israel, the west and India will always take the side of the Tamils. In their eyes (mainly due to Tamil Diaspora lies and for India ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” pressureƒÆ’-¡  from Thamilnadu), it will be protection of the underdog for them ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”the most discriminated people on earthƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢. ƒÆ’-¡ Dr Jayatilleka had been a vehement critique of the LTTE in the past, his current stand of vigorously promoting the Northern Provincial Council Election, which will lead to the end of One Lanka, is unfortunate.

So far no country or international body has threatened Sri Lanka with invasion or sanctions if the Northern provincial council election is not held. No doubt, a strong reaction will come from India and the west, the full extent of it is unknown. ƒÆ’-¡ Our External Affairs Ministry has a major task ahead of it – it should be in a position to explain our adversaries why we had to take steps to abolish the 13th amendment and our diplomats must be capable of calming down the tension that will arise ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” otherwise they are not good diplomats (Senathirajah and PremachandranƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s above statements alone are sufficient to convince the entire world what sort of people the TNA are, and we shouldƒÆ’-¡  educate the world thatƒÆ’-¡  handing the Northern Province to such a group of separatists is akin to ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”leaving the blood bank in charge of DraculaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢). We can learn from the US, UK, Australia, Israel in this regard (how cleverly they manipulate situations in unison to their advantage). We have strong international friends too, letƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s use them to our maximum advantage. The writer does not believe India will ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”invadeƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ Sri Lanka over this issue. The west will not be able to send UN forces (like in East Timor) because China and/or Russia will block the proposal in the UN Security Council (hopefully, we have by now obtained these assurances from them).ƒÆ’-¡  If the 13th amendment is abolished by way of a Referendum, Sri Lanka, from a strong position, will be able to argue that both India and the west (like rest of the international world) have to respect the franchise exercised by the Sri Lankan people. I do not know why Dr Jayatilleka states we should knowingly promote something we know of that is ƒÆ’-¡ dangerous (nobody behaves like that in real life).ƒÆ’-¡  Why cannot he see that the Referendum provides us somewhat a safe passage (the 3rd path)? Would Dr Jayatilleka send his child to school if he knows that something dangerous will happen to the school that day?ƒÆ’-¡  No. Then, why does he knowingly advocate such a dangerous proposition to the Nation?ƒÆ’-¡  The standard of care expected from Dr Jayatilleka (a former senior diplomat) is higher than that of an ordinary political commentator.ƒÆ’-¡ 

Dr JayatillekaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s second argument thatƒÆ’-¡  the Northern Provincial Council must be held for the sake of ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”democracyƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ is not an argument even worth of debating ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” the countryƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s sovereignty which is at stake is more important than anything else. Holding of the Referendum is also a part of the democratic process.

Dr JayatillekaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s comparison of the 2001 general election that brought Mr Ranil Wickarmasinghe into power with the proposed 2013 Northern Provincial Council election (that is going to bring TNA into power) is not a good example; basically he mixes apples with oranges.

ƒÆ’-¡ 

The writer is an Australian Lawyer

Sri Lanka’s Ambassador Dr.Nonis In Outstanding Response To Critics On BBC’s “Impact On Asia.”

June 3rd, 2013

Insight By Sunil Kumar

JuneƒÆ’-¡ 4th 2013

Sri Lanka’s Ambassador ƒÆ’-¡ to the UKƒÆ’-¡ Dr. Nonis in a recent interview on BBC’s Impact on Asia hosted by Mishal HusainƒÆ’-¡  has given an assertive and outstanding response to three panellistsƒÆ’-¡  on the program which in all probabilities is a rapier thrust to the hearts ofƒÆ’-¡ Sri Lanka’s adversaries over the issue of falsely presented Human Rights Violations albeitƒÆ’-¡ seriously flawed and distorted simply to attempt justification.ƒÆ’-¡ 
In the ongoing barrage of accusations againstƒÆ’-¡ Sri Lanka re- human rights violations during the successful decades long Government campaign against the Tamil Tiger terrorists one distinct feature seems to stand out which all point toƒÆ’-¡ a pro Tamil sympathyƒÆ’-¡ based on the insistence of LTTE Rump supportive Tamil Diaspora who have gained acces to certain important areas of overseas administrative facilities and are infiltrating many similar enclaves around the world like a growing pestillenceƒÆ’-¡  simply to aggraveate the present Administration.ƒÆ’-¡ 
The panel comprisingƒÆ’-¡ Canada’s Commonwealth Rep. Hugh Segal,ƒÆ’-¡ free lanceƒÆ’-¡ writer Rosemary Harrison who has complied a documentary ~Still Counting The Dead”ƒÆ’-¡  laced in obvious bias based onƒÆ’-¡ hearsay andƒÆ’-¡  perhapsƒÆ’-¡ where one needs no rocket science to ascertain where she ‘s coming from and where her sympathies lie.Could this also be a consort of Adele Balasingham one wonders?
ƒÆ’-¡ The third panellist wasƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ Sri Lanka’s own Sunday Leader editor Lal WickrematungaƒÆ’-¡ whose contribution to the clarion calls disfavouring Sri LankaƒÆ’-¡ during the best of times seemed apathetic and of a somewhatƒÆ’-¡ homage payingƒÆ’-¡ nature given his status as well as nationality and a total affront to the good work being done presently by the Rajapaksa Administration whilst also casting a slur on his sense of patriotism and damning his loyalty to the Sinhala Nation regardless of what differences the paper he represents might have with the present Administration.
While both Segal and Harrison bemoaned so called “attrocities perpetrated on Tamils”ƒÆ’-¡  by the GOSL with hardly a murmur about the other ethnicities who suffered and what seemed to be a pseudo-prophetic observation in their own mindset that no reconciliation was taking place as though they had observed this first hand, it was alsoƒÆ’-¡ somewhatƒÆ’-¡ disconcerting ƒÆ’-¡ to hear the response of the Sunday Leader Editor who blatantly commented that there was no evidence on the ground repeatedly to indicate thisƒÆ’-¡ and perhaps indicative of the same attitude that has given an air of contentiousness in the eyes of many astute observers relative to the Newspaper he edits short of being blatantly bourgeoisie and arrogant.
While the intent of the panel seemed hell bent on damaging Sri Lanka’s reputation ahead of the forthcoming CHOGM in November where Canada has taken a defiant stand unilaterally to boycott the proceedingsƒÆ’-¡ based onƒÆ’-¡ its venue, their objectives were met in response with a dazzling display of eloquence, statistics and assertive explaining of the realities which surround the reconciliation processƒÆ’-¡ in Sri lanka today by High Commisioner Dr. Nonis and perhaps ended on a sour not for the panellists although none of them were available for comment after the show!ƒÆ’-¡ 
Dr Nonis also explained briefly ƒÆ’-¡ the circumstances surrounding the internecine disturbances involving some radical Sinhalese and Muslims cited by the panelƒÆ’-¡ and that the issue is being resolved favourably by the Government where hopefully calm will return to the problem areas although history has proved that resolving ethnic issues in Sri Lanka were never easy.
The moderator of the interviewƒÆ’-¡ one of the BBC’s mosr accomplishedƒÆ’-¡ Newscaster / JournalistsƒÆ’-¡ Mishal Husain was unbiased in her questioning and at times seemed somewhat perplexed over some of the arguments presented by the panellists and seemed to silence some of them through her dialogue as they appeared to carry no water towards the issue of rights violations in a tangible perspectiveƒÆ’-¡ where for example when the Canadian cited South Africa as being by-passed onceƒÆ’-¡ for a similar event based on the situation the country was in during the pre- Mandela era she had no hesitation toƒÆ’-¡ ask if he was implying that Sri Lanka fell into the same category where his answer was evasive and negativeƒÆ’-¡ conveying an incapacity to justify what he and the rest of the panel were aiming at.
The High Commissioner’s responseƒÆ’-¡ veritably summed up in deference to what the panel was implying that he, through first hand vision from many visits to the regionƒÆ’-¡ could vouch for the progress the Government was making towards re-settling hundreds of thousands of displaced TamilƒÆ’-¡ people in the North, rehabilitating former terroristsƒÆ’-¡ and providing the freedom and equal opportunities for Tamils in that regionƒÆ’-¡  where it is indeed a reality that The Tamil community in that region was greatly appreciative of what the Government had done and is continuing to do.
This perhaps also bearsƒÆ’-¡ testimony to the reality that it was the murderous terrorist leader PrabhakaranƒÆ’-¡ who caused much distress, aggravation and loss of life regardless of what ethnicity it affectedƒÆ’-¡ and that it was the Government and its Armed Forces that came to their rescue contrary to what some of the innuendo, lies and cooked up evidence for very obvious reasonsƒÆ’-¡ are attempting to portray!

Saudi Arabia funding fuels jihadist terror Big chunks of the countryƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s huge oil earnings have been spent on spreading a violent and intolerant variety of Islam

June 3rd, 2013

By Jonathan Manthorpe, Vancouver Sun columnist May 28, 2013 Courtesy Vancouver Sun

ƒÆ’-¡ Where Wahhabi teachings venture, violence soon follows. This anonymous group in the Caucasus area of southern Russia vowed on YouTube to fight back against armed Wahhabi-inspired Caucasus militants. The Black Hawks emerged in mountainous Kabardino-Balkariawith a dramatic promise to destroy ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-bearded IslamistsƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ on an eye-for-an-eye principle. AFP/Getty Images files

The ultimate responsibility for recent atrocities like the Boston Marathon bombing and the butchering last week of an off-duty British soldier is very clear. It belongs to Saudi Arabia.

Over more than two decades, Saudi Arabia has lavished around $100 billion or more on the worldwide promotion of the violent, intolerant and crudely puritanical Wahhabist sect of Islam that the ruling royal family espouses. The links of the Boston bombers and the London butchers to organizations following the Saudi royal familyƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s religious line are clear.

One of the two London butchers, Nigerian-born Michael Adebolajo, was radicalized by the cleric Abu Hamza al-Masri, who headed the outlawed terrorist group Al-Muhajiroun. The group follows Wahhabist teachings and advocates unifying all Muslims, forcibly if necessary, under a single fundamentalist theocratic government.

Similarly, the Boston bombers, Tamerlan and Dzokhar Tsarnaev, hailed from RussiaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s southern predominantly Muslim province of Chechnya. Starting in the late 1980s, Saudi Arabia began dispatching Wahhabist clerics and radical preachers to Chechnya.

The spread of Wahhabism sparked not only a separatist war against the Russians, but also a good deal of violence among Muslims. Wahhabism is now institutionalized in Chechnya and is particularly attractive to young men.

There are similar strands leading back to Wahhabist indoctrination in the histories of very many of the known Muslim terrorists of the last 20 years. The founder of the sect, Muhammad ibn abd al-Wahhab, was an eighteenth century Muslim zealot allied to the Al-Saud clan who promoted an extreme version of Salafism.

Salaf is the Arab word meaning pious ancestor and refers to those who attempt to emulate the pure Islamic life of the Prophet Muhammad and his generation of followers.

But Wahhab and his modern disciples take this notion to extremes. The list of people whom Wahhabists should consider their enemies includes not only Christians, Jews, Hindus and atheists, but also Shiite, Sufi and Sunni Muslims.

And yet no western politicians seem prepared to accept the obvious.

The chances of disaffected young men being drawn into the evil web of Wahhabist murderous extremism would be significantly decreased if the Saudi funding was blocked.

The Saudis began exporting Wahhabism in the early 1970s when the countryƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s oil wealth began growing at an ever-increasing rate.

The amount the Saudi royal family, both by government donations and the generosity of individual princes, now lavishes on Wahhabist schools, colleges, mosques, Islamic centres and the missionary work of fundamentalist imams around the world is extraordinary.

In 2003, a United States Senate committee on terrorism heard testimony that in the previous 20 years Saudi Arabia had spent $87 billion on promoting Wahhabism worldwide. This included financing 210 Islamic centres, 1,500 mosques, 202 colleges and 2,000 madrassas (religious schools).

Various estimates put the amount the Saudi government spends on these missionary institutions as up to $3 billion a year. This money smothers the voices of moderate Muslims and the poison flows into every Muslim community worldwide.

Key figures in the September 2001 attacks on the United States were radicalized at mosques in Germany. Britain is now reckoned by some to be the worst breeding ground anywhere for violent Muslim fundamentalists

Indian newspapers recently reported Saudi Arabia has a massive $35 billion program to build mosques and religious schools across South Asia, where there are major Muslim communities in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and the divided territory of Jammu and Kashmir.

Indian police and Central Intelligence officers were quoted as saying their information came from American intelligence agencies. There are unconfirmed reports that Saudi Arabia and members of the royal family have donated millions of dollars to fund mosques and Islamic centres in Toronto, Ottawa, Calgary and Quebec.

The money, and the emphasis on Wahhabist teaching that comes with it, has caused sharp divisions among Canadian Muslims. Over the years, there have been repeated complaints to Saudi Arabia about its funding of radical indoctrination. But while there has been some toning down of the most inflammatory language in the Wahhabist texts the SaudiƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s disperse, the overall message of the propaganda program has changed little.

Where the Saudi government has retreated under pressure from Washington is in the direct funding of terrorist organizations. It is widely believed by western intelligence agencies that in the 1980s and 90s, the Saudi government had a deal with Wahhabist terrorist groups like al-Qaida that their fundraising would not be hindered so long as they only operated in foreign countries.

However, after the terrorist attack on a residential compound for foreigners in Riyadh in May, 2003, the Saudi government began a crackdown on terrorism. But even though the Saudi government ended official support for groups like al-Qaida, the Taliban and the Pakistani militant group Lashkar-e-Taiba, private donations from Saudi Arabia still find their way to these and similar groups.

But when all is said and done, curbing direct payments to terrorist groups is a small matter when so many billions of dollars continue to be directed at creating terrorists.

Power of the people chased out Eastern Province Governor Mohan Wijewickrama

June 3rd, 2013

A tense situation prevailed at the Lahugala Viharamahadevi Primary School in Ampara yesterday when Eastern Province Governor Mohan Wijewickrama visited the school to look into shortcomings there.

The Governor was warmly welcome by the parents and students but when he announced that the students must go to the Lahugala Old Govipala School for grade two from next year, the parents ran amok and objected to it.

The Governor and Lahugala Pradeshiya Sabha opposition leader Raween Niroshan who was also present were rescued to safety by the police amidst protests by parents

Watch

http://www.dailymirror.lk/news/30258-tense-situation-at-lahugala-primary-school.html

Global Tamil Forum says death of Dr. JJ a great loss

June 3rd, 2013

Courtesy The Island

June 2, 2013, 10:12 pm

article_image

The UK based Global Tamil Forum (GTF) has said that sudden passing away of UNP MP Dr. Jayalath Jayawardana is a great loss to Tamil speaking people, whose plight received the attention of the Gampaha District politician. The GTF said that Jayawardana was a genuine Christian politician who served people of all faith unreservedly.

ƒÆ’-¡ The following is the full text of a statement issued by Rev. Father S. J. Emmanuel, GTF leader based in Germany: “With the passing away of Dr. Jaylath, so early in life, Sri Lanka loses a genuine courageous politician who combined his humanitarian and religious values in serving the people ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” especially those affected by discriminations and violence. As a Tamil catholic priest, who had known him for many years for his interest and services to people of Wanni as well as for his keen interest in restoring the human rights of all, I bear witness to his good Christian life and service. Even recently, in the company of Bishop R. Joseph of Mannar, he was visiting victims of war in the prisons.

ƒÆ’-¡ Here was a man who besides suffering false accusations, threats and even man-handling from his own politicians, went out of his way to travel to war-torn areas to serve the people. He was so altruistic that he was more interested in serving others than his own self or family. He did not possess great wealth to get the necessary medical services in the western world. In his agonising hours of suffering false accusations, he had called on me to get the help of human rights organisations in Geneva.

ƒÆ’-¡ He had a deep devotion to Our Lady of Madhu and contributed much in improving conditions at Madhu. His religious practice as a catholic layman extended beyond pilgrimages and feasts. He crossed religious and ethnic boundaries to bend down to give solace and comfort, aid and medicine to the needy.

ƒÆ’-¡ Tamils in Sri Lanka, especially in Wanni, as well as those in Diaspora, do appreciate the human and religious qualities of this rare politician. At a time when we need more politicians from the South, from among the majority Sinhala community, to stand up for genuine democratic and humanitarian values, which can build up a multi-ethnic, multi-religious and peaceful country, his passing away is a big loss for the future of Sri Lanka.

ƒÆ’-¡ I express my prayerful condolence to the members of his family, to the members of the United National Party and pray God to reward him with Eternal Life.”

Sri LankaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s Traitors and Destabilizing initiatives distancing President from populace

June 2nd, 2013

Shenali D Waduge

With 43 yearsƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ experience in politics, President Rajapakse does not need to be told what politics is all about ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” heƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s been there, seen it and gone through all the ups and downs. It is probably using that cunning that he envelops under his purview all the men and women who in our eyes are unworthy of public office. While this may be a good way to keep a watchful eye it is a dangerous scenario in so far as the safety of state secrets and the manner that they can legally influence and implement policy. It is this that keeps most of us on our toes and watchful of the likely deceits that can take place to undermine the victory over terrorism for which the armed forces sacrificed their lives. We do not want to see a handful of traitors undo and damage a country where terrorism no longer exists.

When a country such as Sri Lanka has an enviable historical record that goes back thousands of years, it is a civilization held together by an ethnic group who continue to remain the majority and whose religion also continues to maintain that majority, the cultural ethos that existed should not be undermined. JapanƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s political leaders would not undermine its cultural ethos or indigenous identity; neither would even countries as modern as Australia. The cultural identity of the country that existed for millennia is not for experiment. The crux of the present dissatisfaction amongst that majority comes from the feeling that certain quarters within the Government are undertaking subtle and overt initiatives to not only distance the President from the majority contributing to his unpopularity but also to legislatively bring changes to dilute the cultural ethos and identity and confine the majority to that of a ceremonial status and make the country vulnerable to foreign intervention.

This works perfectly for the foreign destabilizers who have been dumbfounded as to why its regime change templates are not working out in Sri Lanka. Getting its own people to dig Sri LankaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s grave seems to be working out quite fine.

There are plenty of reasons to question the maneuveringƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s to sideline the majority. Top on the list comes the English media. A good example is how the English media underplayed and blocked the visit of the Thai Prime Minister to Sri Lanka. Was it because she represented a Buddhist nation that her visit did not get a SINGLE front page headline or even a write up on the reason for her visit in either the Daily Mirror or the Island Newspaper and even in the Sunday newspapers ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” whereas enough of space was available for rape and murder and even on the funeral of an opposition MP who was well known for his links with the LTTE and efforts to divide the nation as well as Western officials get front page headlines even before their arrival? Content analysis of the main dailies in Sri Lanka will reveal the exact nature of the bias and the unbalanced coverage given purposely to tilt opinion against the majority calling for editor evaluation and a national media commission.

Credibility is always a factor. The integrity of people is measured by the manner in which they work towards safeguarding the Sri Lankan nation. Any and all who functions to the contrary will naturally be questioned.

Therefore when the people question the present external affairs minister not many should be surprised – ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Power sharingƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-devolutionƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-union of regionsƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ are just a handful of terminology he has used to make him a member of the NGO darling circle and cheered by Western politicians for the ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-gentlemanlyƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ initiatives taken to bring peace to Sri Lanka and ƒÆ’-¡ comparable to another similar persona who claimed ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-victoryƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ in Geneva when realistically that victory came after this Sri Lankan representative secretly inserted a clause stating Sri Lanka would implement the 13th amendment ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” why else wouldnƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢t the quorum at Geneva not vote, in their eyes Sri Lanka had consented which calls for a public apology from this officer to the nation.

A series of other proposals have also paved the way for Sri LankaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s territorial integrity and sovereignty to be questioned. These hiccups have arisen directly as a result of the authorship of the present external affairs minister.

His infamous GL-Neelan Package of constitutional reforms released in August 1995 were hailed as a ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-progressive breakthroughƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” but it advocated devolution of power and it contained provisions for separate land, police and even external aid and taxes which were used as a basis for the LTTEƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s Interim Self-Governing Authority (ISGA). Jayantha Dhanapala was a key player on behalf of President Chandrika at this time while the peace doves represented by Jehan Perera said “With its proposals for an Interim Self Governing Authority, the LTTE has given concrete form to its expectations in a manner that is essentially compatible with peaceful coexistence in a united Sri Lanka.” Are these people surprised when we question their credibility?

GLPƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s 1995 package includes provisions for a separate police force in the Northeast region Para 3.1 ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-There will be a regional police service headed by a Regional Police Commissioner appointed by the Chief Minister, in consultation with the Governor of the Region. The Regional Police Commissioner will be responsible to, and function under the control of, the Relevant Chief Minister. The Regional police service will investigate all offenses against persons and property.”

GLPƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s 1995 Devolution package also contains Land devolution – Para 4.1 Land will be a devolved subject and State land within a region will be vested in the Regional Councils. Para 4.2 Priority in future land settlement schemes will be given to persons first of the district and then of the Region.

GLP;s 1995 also included imposition of taxes and levies by a regional council Para 2.2 stipulates that “Regional Councils will have the powers of taxation in certain specified areas, and the Constitution will require other revenue-sharing arrangements” While Para 2.3 states that “Regional Councils will have the power to borrow as well as to set up their own financial institutions. International borrowing above a prescribed limit will require the concurrence of the center.” Para 2.4, “Regional Councils may regulate and promote foreign direct investment, international grants, and development assistance, subject to such conditions as may be specified by the center.”

It is blatantly clear that the ISGA (Interim-Self-Governing Authority) proposals by the LTTE were prepared on the lines of the proposals made by GL Pieris for the regional councils devolution.

His next target was Buddhism by carefully introducing something called the ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Equal Opportunities ActƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ in 1999 which thanks to Ratnasiri Wickramanayake never materialized. The heading of Bills drafted and the contents therein demands close scrutiny ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” clauses are treacherous!

Sri Lankans have every right to question GLP because following his stint with Chandrika he forsaked her to join the Ranil W Government and came up with another agreement that equally betrayed the nation in the form of the 2002 Cease Fire Agreement which more or less officially gave a defacto State to the LTTE and humiliated the armed forces beyond description. This same devolution architect next went on to join the present Government and it is only a matter of time having made a popular President unpopular he is likely to do to President Rajapakse what he did to Chandrika and Ranil. His past record has shown that he has always abandoned ship for better opportunity and a serial pathological trait carried forward over decades is nothing that will stop repetition.

Thus, given the past record the President cannot be surprised that the country questions the bonafide of the person tasked to steer the foreign policy of the country given that within a handful of years the country has faced diplomatic blunders and catastrophes leading the taxpayer having to pay millions to foreign PR firms as damage control. There are enough of Professors who are proficient in English and who will not be uttering the same gibberish that has now become a nuisance to all listeners. Not only is he taking down the country, the status of the ministry under his tutelage is declining rapidly too.

But, how many in the Government are aware of how many snakes are within its own ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-homeƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ and in what ways can they be ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-monitoredƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ before they can do irreparable damage to the country and how much of this damage can the people write off on the premise that the country is minus terrorism is something the Government cannot evade effectively responding to.

The bottomline is that even a single word on an official document can totally change the framework of a country. Therefore, given the quality of ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-learnedƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ members in Government giving the mantle to the ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-learnedƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ but treacherous handful is not only detrimental to the country but will eventually add to the woes of a popular leader who will find himself becoming unpopular because of the decisions he is being steered to take unknowingly or knowingly using all sorts of diplomatic and multicultural jargon in vogue ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” all of which will only add to the PresidentƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s woes. What has upset the majority populace is the fact of being taken for granted without securing and safeguarding the historical cultural ethos in existence, the basis of which the country came to the level it is and for which lives had been sacrificed to protect the nation.

A more holistic approach to governance is now needed one that does not the cultural identity of a historic civilization or its cultural ethos. Elsewhere round the world the calamities that have arisen are all due to the failures of these experiments.

ƒÆ’-¡ 

 

ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-The SANGHA AND SINHALA BUDDHIST HEGEMONYƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ A POINT OF VIEW

June 2nd, 2013

UPALI COORAY

The criticism leveled at Sangha, in recent times by those who consider them a stumbling block to national reconciliation is that the Sangha have been instrumental over the years in creating a Sinhala Buddhist hegemonic identity in Sri Lanka over the other minority communities. It is claimed that separatism, hitherto the gravest challenge to Sri Lanka, was caused by this Sinhala Buddhist nationalist identity.ƒÆ’-¡  It is also alleged that the Sangha never looked at Buddhism in its proper perspective where no person is born a vassal or a Brahmin but one becomes either of the two by his deeds (na jatta wasalo hothi, na jattaa hothi Brhmano, Kammana Vasalo hothi, Kammana hothi Brahmano) It is also claimed that Sangha never attempted to encompass the minorities in this country to their mission as ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Buddha PuthrasƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ preaching equanimity and, compassion to all human beings. ƒÆ’-¡ On the contrary it is alleged that they were instrumental in inculcating ethnic detestation stemming off from perceptional and mythical exclusivity of Sinhala Buddhist nation.

It is true the Sangha in Sri Lanka as a religious institution has never been devoid of its own segregations to different orthodoxies such as the Jetawana and Mahavihara espousing Mahayana and Theravada Buddhism in ancient times.ƒÆ’-¡  Nikayas or monastic sects are based on the caste system. Land Lordism among the Sangha which is practiced even today, was in existence from ancient times.ƒÆ’-¡  Actvities inappropriate, such as engaging in businesses, Luxurious living, and occult practices were done and are being done by a segment of the Sangha. However the positive influence the Sangha had in the Socio-political improvements and restoration far outweigh the negativity of one segment of the Buddhist clergy.

ƒÆ’-¡ A close look at the history of Sri Lanka will enlighten us that the Sangha irrespective of internal differentiations of its own has come to be identified with the Sinhala majority from the earliest times of our history. This identification is not a mechanical happening or a choice, but a historical compulsion making them to be identified so.

The local chronicles portray devastating invasions by south Indian marauders plundering Sri Lanka. The first such attack came from Sena and Guttika in 177BC. Then onwards, up to the 15 th century till the Europeans took over; the South Indian invasions occurred periodically out of which Kalinga MaghaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s was the most devastating.ƒÆ’-¡  The reign of Magha (1215 -36) was so brutal, The Buddhist religion, its clergy, image houses and chetiyas were completely decimated, many books were torn and burnt. The majestic chetiyas such as Ruwanweli were destroyed and the relics which were the very souls of Buddhist of Sri Lanka were made to disappear. In short the culture of the Sinhalese was trampled and crushed from which it could never recover. The chroniclers of these events were mostly Bikkhus and the notion that they overrated the events will not always hold water because there are archeological corroborations for most of the events.ƒÆ’-¡  The crux of the chronicles such as ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-MahavamsaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ and ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Chula WansaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ cannot be jettisoned as expected by some who call for national reconciliation and harmony among communities in this country. The mindset of successive generations of the Sangha evolved around these traumatic events. Buddhism is a religion that did not advocate conquests as a means of spreading the Dhamma. Even king Dharmasoka converted himself to Buddhism subsequent only to his enthroning as the emperor of India and sent his son Arahath Mahinda to Sri Lanka carrying the message of the enlightened one. King Asoka was known as Chandasoka(Asoka the vile) prior to his conversion to Buddhism. On the contrary Hindu rulers who conquered Sri Lanka were bent on decimating Buddhism and subjugating its laity and clergy.ƒÆ’-¡  The ruins that exist to date at Polonnaruwa are a manifestation of forced Hindu culture on Sri Lanka. On the contrary there were no Islamic invasions similar to in India that took place in Sri Lanka. The followers of Islam came here mainly for trading purposes.ƒÆ’-¡  Their invasions of the Indian subcontinent did not have a big impact on Sri Lanka compared to Hindu invasions. ƒÆ’-¡ Therefore we do not see any conflicts between the Sinhalese and the Muslim communities till recent times. Muslims were a part of Sri Lankan society not in conflict with the majority Buddhists.

It need not be mentioned that the Europeans who conquered this country since the 15th century believed that they have a divine mandate to propagate their own religions in the lands they conquered and to bring the native ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-heathensƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ to subjugation. Therefore the role of the Sangha continued as protectors of Sinhala Buddhist identity from European Missionaries during these times. The brutal devastation of religious and cultural assets including mass annihilation of indigenous people was part of their rule. Speaking in modern parlance itƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s a vast catalogue of human rights violations. The irony of this whole saga is that while Jews are being compensated for the ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Holocaust ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-not a penny has been paid as compensation to massacres of masses of similar human beings in former colonies.

In the foregoing scenario, the Sangha in Sri Lanka had no other preference than identifying with the Sinhala race and to preserve the Dhamma at immense odds whereas in India, Buddhism gave into Hinduism and Islam after King DharmasokaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s reign. Hypothetically, had Buddhism thrived in India continuously since Buddha; neither a specific Sinhala Buddhist identity nor conquests of Sri Lanka by Hindu rulers may have happened and a question of separatism also might not have arisen because Buddhism would have been one of the key religions of the Tamil peoples in India and Sri Lanka.

Our history shows that external threats have been part and parcel of the countryƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s existence. It is so even to date. the methodology adopted only is different from the ancient times. Devious conversions of Buddhist to other religions and spreading of such religions by covert methods in the name of freedom of religion and freedom of expression continues unhindered in spite of attempts by Sangha in thwarting them. Democracy and human rights are the other catch phrases used thereby devaluing the very meanings of the phrases. Destabilizing this country has always been a hidden agenda of powerful external forces and their internal partners which will be so in the future too. The Sri Lankan separatist lobby now domiciled in the west is the driving force of external pressure. The Sangha senses this more than the laity. No Tamil leadership has so far been able to give the confidence required by the Sangha to allay their suspicions and fears of separatism. Calling the Sangha fundamentalist or Chauvinists would only harden the stand taken by them. Some scholars have attempted to emphasize that the roots of Buddhist fundamentalism is the ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Mytho HistoryƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ in the chronicles. This distorted and erroneous view is suggesting that Buddhist fundamentalism is an illusory perception. While accepting that Chronicles are manifestly awash with myth, one has to realize that the myth is mixed with authenticity that does not fall into so called ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬Mytho historyƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ The leadership of Sangha cannot be unaware of these facts and are not blind followers of historical myths of the chronicles as suggested by theses scholars.

While it is true that the Buddhist monk should have commitment to ascetic ideals, the monk cannot just overlook the compelling socio-political incursions that overrides his ascetic life. This does not mean that there are no ascetic monks among the Buddhist clergy but it applies to most monks who have committed themselves to respond to vital social and political needs. This trend was strengthened by Angarika Dharmapala who held a strong Sinhala Buddhist ideology. He expected Sangha to be the custodian and guardian of the flock and a social worker and had two objectives, the first being theƒÆ’-¡  improvement of the quality of life of the people and the second being the revival of Sinhala Buddhist ideology and culture as in the ancient times. ƒÆ’-¡ It became necessary for Dharmapala to advocate social service by the Sangha in addition to ascetic life as he foresaw that sweeping social reformation was required for the Buddhist laity to be unshackled from long years of subjugation and associated economic and cultural enslavement to the foreign rulers whose only objective was to exploit the human and material resources of the colonies. ƒÆ’-¡ 

In 1945, The Vidayalankara Pirivena (Monastary) which was one of the main two monasteries (Vidyodaya was the other) issued a publication titled ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-The Bikkhu and Politics ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-espousing that Sangha should take up politics with a view to reforming society and establishing its due place for Buddhism and the culture of the Sinhalese which has got battered through centuries of foreign domination. It should be noteworthy that while Sir Nicholas Attygala was strongly supportive of the initiative D.S Senanayake and J.R Jayawardene were vehemently opposing the move.ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡  Ven.Kotahene Pagnakitti and Ven.Yakkaduwe pagnarama were two pioneering Bikkhus for the movement. ƒÆ’-¡ Subsequently, Ven Henpitagedara Gnanasiha and the Buddhist commission took the movement forward through Eksath Bikkhu Permuna(United front of Bhikkus) ƒÆ’-¡ Then U.N.P government headed by Prime Minister D.S Senanyake was reluctant to appoint a Buddhist Commission on the pretext of non conformity with the Soulbury constitution. However it was known that D.S was under pressure from other religious groups supportive of his government. Therefore the Buddhist Commission had to go it alone without state patronage and it did probe in to the system of education and other areas where Buddhists did not have their rightful place. While intellectuals such as Professor Gunapala Malalasekara, P de S Kularatne,L.H Mettananda Dr. Tennekone Wimalananda, D.C Wijewardane consisted of the lay members Ven Ambanwela Siddhartha, Haliela Sumanatissa, Balangoda Ananda Maithriya and Henpitagedara Gnanasiha were the members from the clergy. ƒÆ’-¡ 

The U.N.P government of which then prime minister was Sir John Kotalawala was very casual on the report, The Mahajana Eksath Peramuna led by S.W.R.D Bandaranaike endorsed the recommendations and that led to a resounding victory for them in 1956; a defining moment of the countryƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s history. Bandaranaike who was a senior minister from 1947 to 1952 in the U.N.P government; which was more or less subservient to the colonial masters, was disgruntled for not being appointed as the prime minister after D.S Senanyake. The government of the time was indifferent to the calls by the Sinhala Buddhists of this country to restore their proper place in the country as the majority community. Badaranaika who was a smart strategist saw the opportunity in the Sinhala Buddhist reawakening program headed by the Sangha and rode the wave to become the Prime Minister of the M.E.P Mahajana Eksath Peramuna( PeoplesƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ United Front) Factually it was the Buddhist Commission report, the Sangha led by Henpitagedara Gnanasiha who were the architects of this victory. Bandaranaike was very comfortable with pro-colonial policies of the Senanyake government till he missed the opportunity to become the Prime Minister under that government. He was a weak and wavering leader and soon the country was in disarray. It has to be noted that scholars such as Mettananda, Malalasekara and Kularatna never espoused Sinhala only policy but were of the view that all three languages viz. Sinhala, English and Tamil should be taught in all schools. ƒÆ’-¡ ItƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s a tragedy that SWRD was the victim of a bullet fired by a member of the Sangha; one strong force who brought him to power and later revelations showed the Bikkhu who fired the shot was only a pawn of a group of people very close to Bandaranaike in which a leading monk of the time was also a member. The reason for the killing had nothing to do with Sinhala Buddhist inclination of the government but was solely a private business affair which is a reflection that some of the clergy were in proscribed pursuits.

The failed coup dƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’†’©tat of 1962 against the government of Mrs. Sirimawo Bandaranaike illustrates that non Buddhist elements were at work to bring back the status quo of pro – colonial policy. Prior to 1956 the officer corps the army consisted of three fifths Christian, one fifth Tamil and one fifth Burger. Bandaranaike changed this balance by bringing in more Sinhala Buddhist officers. A non carrier Buddhist Inspector General of Police was appointed by SWRD over three more Christian officers. The British bases at Katunayka and Trincomalee were removed. The resentment among Christians were building who felt that they were systematically being eliminated. A coup by the military was thus planned by the military. 26 top brass who were prosecuted were Christians. P.de S Kularatna who was a member of the Buddhist Commission and a highly respected educationist; by then who was an MP, gave out the information to the government. He received this information from the then IGP Stanly Senanyake, his son ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” in ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…”law.

ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ The defeat of Terrorism, sponsored fed and grown with the support of external forces for geo- political motives, would notƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡  have been possible if not for the backing of the Sangha and the Sinhala Buddhist laity. Not only did they give moral support for the war effort, there were monks who canvassed for recruitment of youth for the forces. This is one of the main reasons for the single minded effort by President Mahinda Rajapaksa to succeed in eradication of terrorism from our soil.

What we are seeing today is history of our country repeating itself. To the Sangha, Well being of the nation state and the survival of Buddhism has taken priority over the inspirational teaching of Gautama the Buddha who was a pacifist. One cannot miss the similarities in Kalinga Magha and Prabhakaran. The threat from the Indian subcontinent towards the unitary state of Sri Lanka has reached to its highest level in the recent history a recurring historical fact. The motives of the present day rulers of southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu are quite terrifying and cannot be shunned away as rhetoric. The Sangha in this scenario is playing its historical role and nothing else. Calling them fundamentalists or chauvanists is a misnomer to paint a picture similar to extremist religious movements such as Taleban or Lashker- e-Taiba that enforces inhuman draconian laws. Buddhist fundamentalism; if there is one, seems to be an internal difference of opinions on Buddhism and the mission of the Sangha. Other religions, mainly Christian and Muslim have no such restrictions. To these fundamentalist anyone who does not believe as they do is inferior and needs to be converted to their thinking, by force if necessary. The Christian fundamentalist proclaims that anyone of any religion that does not believe in their ways is condemned to hell. There is also a belief and an effort to turn the United States into a Christian theocracy. They believe that it is their Christian duty to impose their views on others. Radical Muslims in many countries try to force Sharia law on those that donƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢t believe as they do. It is this difference that the Sangha and the Sinhala Buddhists are wary of. The term fundamentalist if it applies to Buddhism cries out for far less radical terms.

Travels of a journalist [2013 Series #3] Weligama Podda tours his native South in the guise of a global citizen

June 2nd, 2013

By Shelton Gunaratne, author of From Village Boy to Global Citizen, Vol. 1: The Journey of a Journalist; and Vol. 2: The Travels of a Journalist (Bloomington, IN: Xlibris).

ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-ThereƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s no place like homeƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ is the last line of the 1822 song ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Home Sweet HomeƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ written by John Howard Payne. From music, the phrase passed onto drama and books as well.

The phrase inspired me to create my 2012 book Village Life in the Forties (Bloomington, IN: iUniverse), a collection of autobiographical sketches highlighting my experiences in the village of Pathegama, which I still consider to be my ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-homeƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ even though I left Sri Lanka at the age of 26 to live overseas.

Thus, I gave top priority to re-visiting Pathegama during my 2013 island wide excursion. I wanted to re-connect with the entire Southern Province comprising 2.3 million people living in an area of 5,559 square kilometers. We decided to spend one day exploring the coastal area of the Galle District, and another day imposing ourselves on our relatives in the Matara District. Then, we would hurry through the Hambantota District all the way to Tissamaharama to spend the third night.

Our driver, Amal Chandrakumara, picked us up in Negombo Sunday morning for a lecture in Colombo. Early afternoon, we proceeded on our journey along the 128 km Southern Expressway, the countryƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s first freeway, which has slashed travel time between Colombo and Matara to a mere 1.5 hours. I was disappointed that the expressway rest stops were commercial ventures that required money even to use the ground-floor toilet facilities unlike the Minnesota rest areas on Interstate 94, which provide travelers with picnic tables, walking paths, free toilets, etc.

Galleroute

We left the expressway at Exit 7 (the Baddegama Interchange), 103 km from Colombo, because our driver was keen to show us the moonstone mining operation in Meetiyagoda, near Hikkaduwa. Moonshine is a feldspar that has a special shine that resembles the moonƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s. The mineƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s sales folk couldnƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢t persuade us to buy any moonstones but they succeeded in selling us a packet of peeled cinnamon for Rs. 200. The mine was only 2.5 km away from the site of the worldƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s worst railway disaster that killed 2,000 people when the Boxing Day tsunami of 2004 overturned a crowded train.

Then, we drove southeast on the coastal road to Galle witnessing the damage the 2004 undersea megathrust earthquake had inflicted on the tourist town of Hikkaduwa renowned for its surfing and snorkeling facilities. We saw the new housing schemes that various philanthropic organizations had built to settle down the survivors of the fisher folk devoured by the 30-meter high waves of the Indian Ocean energized by a powerful undersea earthquake epicentered in the Indonesian waters more than a thousand kilometers away.

Although Galle (pop. ƒÆ’-¡ 112,252) was our destination for the day, we drove an extra 10 km further east on the Imaduwa Road to the village of Happawana, where my older sister Rani ƒÆ’-¡ used to live.ƒÆ’-¡  On my excursions to Sri Lanka in the 1990s, I used her home named ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Somagiri,ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ located on a hillock, as my operational headquarters.

Rani and her husband left ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-SomagiriƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ to live in a new house they built in Kurunegala, the city that we planned to visit at the end of our island wide tour.

Because both Yoke-Sim and I had stayed in ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-SomagiriƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ a few times, we had nostalgic reasons to re-visit it to see its current condition. But we had difficulty locating the property because, as our inquiries revealed, the neighbor in a land dispute had closed the path to ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Somagiri,ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ the once majestic hilltop bungalow. Sudu Mahattaya had to hire a tuk-tuk to transport us to the hilltop through a makeshift footpath.

ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-SomagiriƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ was now in shambles.ƒÆ’-¡  The occupants had turned the colonial style verandah into a storehouse for paddy. Signs of gloom and doom depressed us, but we joined the couple for evening tea. Knowing full well that the couple was financially down and out, we gave them a financial gift before we returned to Galle to check in at Frangipani Motel on Pedlar Street in the fort.

I have already recounted my Happawana exploits in Chapter 18 of the first volume of my autobiography subtitled The Journey of a Journalist (Xlibris, 2012). I recalled the role of Mahadenamutta I played in evening discussions with the cream of the Happawana intellectualsƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”‚Gunapala, the village political analyst; and Siripala (aka Sathya Dayaratne), the novelist. Only Wickremasinghe, the schoolmaster, made it to see me on this short stopover.

Inasmuch as I was a literature buff in my early years, it occurred to me that the Southern Province was the birthplace of three of my favorite writersƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”‚Jinadasa Vijayatunga (1903-1989), the author of Grass for My Feet; Gunadasa Amarasekera (born in 1929), the author of Karumakkarayo; and Martin Wickremasinghe (1890-1976), the author of Gamperaliya. Amarasekera was born in Yatalamatta, just five km north of Urala, where Vijayatunga was born. These two villages lay along the Wanduramba Road northwest of the Pinnaduwa Interchange of the Southern Expressway.

Malalgama, the birthplace of Wickremasinghe, lay close to the coastal highway in Koggala, about 15 km east of Galle. I found immeasurable satisfaction in reading most of his masterpieces. I was proud to imitate the Wickremasinghe style when I submitted assignments to the Sinhala Literature class that D. B. Kuruppu taught at Ananda College. ƒÆ’-¡ My birth village of Pathegama was only 12 km northeast of Malalgama.

We decided to focus on Koggala and Pathegama most of Monday. Although we had been to Galle many times before, we did not know much about the Galle Fort (also called the ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Ramparts of GalleƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬), which the Portuguese built in 1588 and the Dutch extensively fortified from 1649 onwards. Therefore, we took up AmalƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s suggestion to admire and explore this exceptionally well-maintained World Heritage site, which withstood the force of the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami. The posh Amangalla resort hotel, originally built in 1684 to house the Dutch governor and his retinue, is an outstanding part of the fort complex.

Galle, the islandƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s third largest municipality, has developed around the Galle Fort area, which covers 52 hectares (about 130ƒÆ’-¡ acres) of the city area of 1,650 hectares. In 1663, the Dutch added some 14 bastions built of coral and granite to strengthen the fort, which now looked like a small laid out walled city with a rectangular grid pattern of streets full of the Dutch colonial style low houses with gables and verandahs. Our walk on the walls of the fort brought memories of my visits to the walled cities of Chester and York (in England), and Xian (in China). The well laid out road network and the many historical buildings of the fort impressed us. The cultural diversity of the fort residentsƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”‚Sinhalese, Moors, Tamils, Europeans, and othersƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”‚was another feature of the fort.

RampartofgalleA seasscape from the top of a granite wall in the “Ramparts of Galle.” The writer and his spouse are in the foreground. [Photo by Amal Chandrakumara.]

After eating our breakfast at a popular pastry shop in Galle, we drove east on the coastal highway, past the suburb of UnawatunaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”‚well known for its Jungle Beach, Peace Pagoda, and the Rumassala MountainƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”‚to Koggala, the site of the Martin Wickremasinghe Museum of Folk Culture complex.
I had already visited this complex in the early 1990s when I was vacationing in Happawana. Because the man in the ticket booth agreed that a native of a neighboring village should not be treated as a foreigner, he charged me only Rs. 20 whereas Yoke-Sim had to pay an admission fee of Rs. 200.

The museum complex has an ecosystem implanted to reflect a multitude of the indigenous trees and shrubs, as well as the bird life it attracts, that Wickremasinghe mentions in his writings. It is a remarkable attempt to recreate the novelistƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s homestead in Malalgama. His ashes lie in the mound on the right flank of the house. The Hall of Life exhibits many of his memorabilia and tells his life story through a plethora of photographs, awards and souvenirs.

Since the museumƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s opening in 1981, it has expanded itself to accommodate many artifacts of Sri Lankan folk culture from ancient to modern times, including those related to rural technology and religious ceremonies. I was privileged to donate a complimentary copy of my book Village Life in the Forties to the museumƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s exhibition of the works of southern writers.

[Courtesy: Sunday Times]

ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”2013 ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡.

June 2nd, 2013

Media Unit Ministry of Power & Enrgy

ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”-ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶©ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”2013 ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¥ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡.

ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”-ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶©ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶©ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  (Mr. Alexander Novak) ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º.

ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶®ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶®ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡.

ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶®ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  35ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¨ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘. ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶º: ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ 2014 -2018 ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶³ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶³ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶³ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘.

ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ 27 ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ 30 ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”-ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”- ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶º. ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¨ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ 30 ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” 2014 – 2018 ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶³ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶« ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶³ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”.

ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”-ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶©ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶©ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  (Mr. Alexander Novak) ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶©ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ · (Mr. Majid Namjoo) ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¡ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”.

ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶³ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶³ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶³ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶º. ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ”¹…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ”¹…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶³ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¡ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘. ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘, ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶³ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¡ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º. ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶³ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶³ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶º.

 

 

 

Doctors, Nurses and Attendants at Hospital Accident Ward Watch TV Instead of Treating Emergency Patient in Urgent Need

June 1st, 2013

Selyna. D. Peiris LLB (Hull) LLM (London) MAIS (Vienna)

Last night (28.05.2013), a young trainee nurse from Nawalapitiya was tossed out of a moving bus unto the bustling street in Kirulapone and fell right in front of my moving car.

While a Police Officer from the Wellawatte Station was questioning the bus driver, a friend and I rushed her to the General Hospital of Colombo ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” the biggest government hospital in this entire country.

Upon reaching the emergency entrance of the hospital, we were ordered by the nurse at the entrance to wheel out a stretcher and to place the patient on this stretcher. It was not a busy night. Having so done, we were then ordered to push her into to the accident ward which, after disturbing many, we actually found. Here we had a patient who was vomiting out blood and as far as the attendants, nurses and doctors were concerned, the soap opera on TV was far more important to attend to at this hour.

I attach a picture as evidence of this. After painfully having managed to get her an x-ray, we had to run around the ward to convince the doctor that this patient was actually worth having a look at.

Accident ward

Finally, after about 2 hours of mayhem, she was admitted to the ward and we were praying that she has no major injuries.

The anger and disgust that I felt at this period of time affected me to the very core of my being. I was appalled at the treatment which ordinary citizens face in times of greatest need and ashamed that I was too ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-privilegedƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ never to have experienced this before.

This is the sad reality of this ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Island in ParadiseƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬. I am ashamed today to live in a country with such blatant disregard for human life. The compassion and loving kindness so inherent to our culture is now merely folklore.

There are great many young people who are willing to take a stand for reforms in a manner that is the least counter productive for the growth of this country ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” please help us to do so by sharing this message with people who can make a change, however small.

ƒÆ’-¡ Selyna. D. Peiris

ƒÆ’-¡ LLB (Hull) LLM (London) MAIS (Vienna)

 

UNITY & SOVEREIGNTY OF SRILANKA

June 1st, 2013

Kanthar P Balanathan, Melbourne, Australia

General

SriLanka is subjected to (a) negative impactƒÆ’-¡ of foreign forces impeding the achievementƒÆ’-¡ of peace, economic and political stability (b) theƒÆ’-¡ propagandaƒÆ’-¡ fabricated by the Tamil diaspora which lacksƒÆ’-¡ veracity (c) a few unpatriotic politicians in the opposition and otherwise calling for support on secession and/or equal rights, and (d) Tamil Nadu politicians and students uprise against SL.

We, SriLankan are able to view the multidimensional diplomatic and economic forces on SL and the disproportionate level of stress, and how the non-patriotic political parties, and politicians are dancing to the programmed foreign rhythm of music. Few points are discussed here to revoke the 13th amendment, and implement section 157A of the Constitution to strip politicians and people who advocate separatism, from civic rights.

Demography

Demography as defined in the ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-business directoryƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ is the study of both quantitative and qualitative aspects of human population. Quantitative aspects includeƒÆ’-¡ composition, density,ƒÆ’-¡ distribution, growth, movement, size, andƒÆ’-¡ structureƒÆ’-¡ of the population. Qualitative aspects are the sociologicalƒÆ’-¡ factorsƒÆ’-¡ such asƒÆ’-¡ education quality,ƒÆ’-¡ crime,ƒÆ’-¡ development, diet and nutrition, race,ƒÆ’-¡ social class,ƒÆ’-¡ wealth and wellbeing.

Ref: http://www.statistics.gov.lk/PopHouSat/CPH2011/index.php?fileName=pop42&gp=Activities&tpl=3

Department of Census & Statistics, SriLanka-Year 2012

Total population:ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡  20,263,723

Sinhalese:ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡  15,173,820

SriLanka Tamils:ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡  2,270,924

Indian Tamils:ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡  842,323

ƒÆ’-¡ 

Persons

Percentage %

Total population:

20,263,723

100.00%

Sinhalese:

15,173,820

74.88%

SriLanka Tamils:

2,270,924

11.21%

Indian Tamils:

842,323

4.16%

ƒÆ’-¡ 

Statistics of SL Tamils in the North ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡  ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ Statistics of SL Tamils in the East

ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ 

Statistics of SL Tamils outside N&E

ƒÆ’-¡ 

Percentage of SL Tamils inhabiting SriLanka on an ethnic concentration.

From the statistics it is evident that 29.66% of the SriLankan Tamils; i.e. 3.32% of the total population dwell outside N&E, and only 43.49% of the SriLankan Tamils i.e. 4.87% of the total population, populate the North.

On a demographic array of the N&E, i.e. qualitative facets of human populace, for almost 30 years, the N&E was infested with crime, terrorism,ƒÆ’-¡ racial conflicts,ƒÆ’-¡ and social class division among Tamils, which inflicted the minds of the Tamils with terrorism, separatism, and racial xenophobic outlook.

Equal Rights

Tamils are calling and demanding for ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Equal RightsƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ & ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Power SharingƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬. Let us dig into the term ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Equal RightsƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬.

Ref: Wikipedia a few examples for analysis as below:

ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Equality before the law, also known asƒÆ’-¡ equality under the law,ƒÆ’-¡ equality in the eyes of the law, orƒÆ’-¡ legal equality, is the principle under which all people are subject to the same laws of justiceƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬.

ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Human rightsƒÆ’-¡ are “commonly understood as inalienable fundamental rightsƒÆ’-¡ to which a person is inherently entitled simply because she or he is a human being.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬

ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Civil and political rightsƒÆ’-¡ are a class of rightsƒÆ’-¡ that protect individualsƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ freedomƒÆ’-¡ from unwarranted infringement by governmentsƒÆ’-¡ and private organizations, and ensure one’s ability to participate in the civil and political life of the stateƒÆ’-¡ without discriminationƒÆ’-¡ or repression.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬

ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Women’s rightsƒÆ’-¡ are the rightsƒÆ’-¡ and entitlementsƒÆ’-¡ claimed for women and girls of many societies worldwide.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬

ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Social equalityƒÆ’-¡ is a state of affairs in which all people within a specific society or isolated group have the same status in certain respectsƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬.ƒÆ’-¡ 

Can any politician specifically pin point on the area of equal rights where SL has gone wrong? Does SL have different Law for the Sinhalese, Tamils & Muslims? Tamils can move, purchase land, work settle anywhere in SL. They can participate in the political activities, contest elections and even become the Prime Minister within the Law and the framework of the constitution. DidnƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢t Sivajilingham contest in the Presidential elections? Was he not the Leader of the, one-time, terrorist, Tamil Elam Liberation Organisation?

In fact the above census analysis shows that 29.66% of the SriLankan Tamils reside outside the N&E. Are they subjected to any form of equal & human rights violation? In fact those people should be millionaires.

However, it is those ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-TamilsƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ who do not provide equal rights to their brothers and sisters on the basis of caste, creed and region where they come from. Tamils have their own ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Thesavalamai Law, and Mukkuvars Law. They do not allow practice of Budhdhism in the N&E and settlement of Sinhalese who are citizens of SL.

The ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Rule of LawƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ will not allow GOSL, for politicians, people and journalists to practice those, which pose ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-National SecurityƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ to SL. If allowed, then it is a serious violation of the Constitution.

Tamils are living in Italy, Norway, Denmark, France, some small European countries & South Americas and can speak the local language. If they can do that what prevents them to be in SL, learn Sinhala, and lead a good life?

It is also of a general thinking that Human Rights Violation prevails in a Communist/Socialist environment, but not in a market driven economy.

Provincial Council

What added value has the PCƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s delivered to the people and the country over the last few years?ƒÆ’-¡ 

We were able to hear and read PCƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s complain only.

  1. PCs have been only complaining on lack of funds.
  2. Proliferation of bribery & corruption?
  3. The PCs want more power, but does not want to improve their provinces.
  4. Personal enrichment of status and wealth.

What our PC politicians want is political power for their own self-esteem and personalƒÆ’-¡ economic well-being, while millions of people struggle to push through their day to day living.

On an intellectual level of rational assessment and judgment, is it justifiable to devolve power to only 4.87% of the population at the expense of the 95.13%, where most foreign exchange earning yields from the South?

Well, it shows a criminal activity when India walked into SriLanka and ordered JRJ; ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Hey, this is 13th amendment, pass it on and implementƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬. It is of view that Indians never think on a comprehensive profoundness, perspicacity and complexity. Here, it is considered a ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-criminal activity, because a nation has ordered to note heavy liability to another nation without proper analysis and judgment.

Devolution of Power

Devolution of power and the need to decentralise power to Provinces or states is not to be construed as ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-LUXURYƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬. A country with inflow of large foreign capital or revenue may require power to be devolved to regions for effective and efficient financial management. In addition, a large population may require devolution of power on a Human Geographical and Demographical perspective as a ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Political CommunityƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬.

An example: SriLanka foreign exchange earnings are accrued is from Tea, Rubber and gems, all of which are resources in the South. The North was a liability to the South and the South is considered an asset. South subsidised the N&E for its survival over the years and is continuing to do so.

Qualitative aspects are the sociologicalƒÆ’-¡ factorsƒÆ’-¡ such asƒÆ’-¡ education quality,ƒÆ’-¡ crime,ƒÆ’-¡ development, diet and nutrition, race,ƒÆ’-¡ social class,ƒÆ’-¡ wealth and wellbeing. Being a Tamil, I can confidently state that most Tamils lack in, Listening skills, conflict resolution and never contended with what they have, but to accrue more and more wealth.

We have a distressing and demoralizing caste system, whereby Tamil Elite thoughts are: A barberƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s son should do barber job. Tamil Diaspora, who is in business, names their shops: ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Tamil Spice ShopsƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬, Thamizhar MandapamƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬, etc. In time to come they may construct toilets and name them; ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Thamizhar KatkusuƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬, meaning ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-TamilƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s ToiletƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬. This is an indication of their racist superiority and mind set, particularly in overseas countries.

The negating viewpoints of Provincial Council are as follows:

  1. The population concentration of 4.87% (987,692 people) against 95.13% in a country does not demand a separate political structure and governance. This will only blow up expenditure driving the country towards paucity.
  2. The natural resources in the North are quite negligible compared to the rest of the country. Economic sustainability in the North can be construed as quite weak. Resource such as water is quite low and can affect agrarian development.
  3. Qualitative aspects such as the sociologicalƒÆ’-¡ factors;ƒÆ’-¡ race,ƒÆ’-¡ social class,ƒÆ’-¡ wealth and wellbeing, magnanimity, openness and readiness to develop the region is deficient in the minds of the Tamils in the North. Tamils want easy job, such as trading (spice shop, Dosai kades), temple management for monetary accrual, and most of students want white collar jobs. Their commitment to entrepreneurship is absent. Tamils have, over the past 65 years, proved that they are unpatriotic to SriLanka.
  4. The recurrent expenditure for the provincial councils was dramatic; increasing from 28,856 million in 2000 to 111.336 billion in 2009. This expenditure over the 9 years has not proved innovation, creative development, enhancement in the intellectual abilities of locals and patriotism, however, only sucked the coffer of the SL treasury. Cost analysis would reveal that the ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-opportunity costƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ would have developed the provinces. We, SriLankan are able to see the current command of governance has proven significant level of development in all spheres.
  5. The Tax Department should be able to give details of tax collected from the North. Would the volume of tax collected from the (half of 4.87%-males) North adequate to run the PC? Are all Tamils paying tax in the North? Comparison with the rest of the province should give clear indication of non-payment of tax. Are the Local Government(s) collecting land tax?
  6. 3.32% of the SL Tamils reside outside N&E. University graduates, Para-professionals and others may have an eager to drift out of the N&E to Colombo or the South in time to come. This may have an effect on the supply and demand. The comfort of these drifters (Tamils) from the N&E will be at the expense of the local natives who have lived there for donkey years. The question is; will the hoboes add value to the economy of the province? Eventually the imbalance in the supply and demand may weaken the inflation and impact GDP. GOSL should study the drift pattern of the Tamils from the N&E over the last 30 years.
  7. Could Sampanthar & Co explain to the parliament and the cabinet ministers their strategic vision to create jobs for the graduates, if such a Provincial Council is elected? How do they propose to create jobs for the students coming out of the, trade schools, Technical Colleges and Polytechnics? Do they depend on the center for subsidies? In a democratic environment, political partyƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s financial strategy should be transparent. Could Sampanthar & Co vouch GOSL that they can bond graduates and trades peoples for ten yearsƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ or more service within the N&E province?
  8. If the system will not change, but continue to have an inflow to the South, then what is the added value of having PCs?
  9. Mr Gajendrakumar Ponnambalam is crying and moaning for Tamil Elam. Will GGP sell and relocate his multi-million Rs. Serendib Land plc business to the N&E to improve the Provincial outlook? (Ref: http://www.cse.lk/cmt/upload_report_file/630_1346326156.pdf). If GGP disagrees then GGP should give clear reasons for not being able to do so?
  10. India nudged the 13th amendment onto SL to satisfy the Tamil Nadu people. India has war fronts in the North, East and West (not eliminated). India has lived on with that fear of Tamil Nadu people rise against separation. This fear forces them to dance to the tunes of the Tamilians in TN. Further LTTE was domiciled in TN and was becoming popular among the TN separatists. A strategic move by Delhi drove LTTE out of TN and forced JRJ to accept the 13th amendment. This was a blunder late JRJ made. Well, late JRJ sold SL to the Indians.
  11. 11.ƒÆ’-¡  India does not understand the socio-politico-economic situation of SL. They have always been dominant on SL affairs right from Nehru to RG and now Sonia Ghandi. India is the worst country that practices Human Rights Violation.
  12. Excerpts from an article written by Neville Ladduwahetty, ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-LLRC Recommendations Not Met by 13AƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬.
  • ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-The Government of Sri Lanka proceeding further into consolidating the Provincial Council system under the 13th Amendment amounts to ignoring key recommendations of the LLRC; a prospect that is bound to bring serious condemnations in future sessions at Geneva possibly followed by measures to punish Sri Lanka for ignoring international dictates. Therefore, the Government of Sri Lanka is duty bound to bring to the attention of the International Community, the US and India that accommodating the key recommendations of the LLRC would entail revisions to existing provisions of the 13th Amendment since no provisions currently exist in it to accommodate the key recommendations in the LLRC Report : discouraging secessionist tendencies, devolution to grass roots levels, and power sharing at the CenterƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬.
  1. Provincial Council to the N&E is like feeding lamb(s) to the Hyenas. The threat of separatism cannot be extinguished from the minds of the Jaffna Tamils. It will be a gradual, infinite move by the Tamils, and with the help of the TN, separatism may explode in time to come.

Violation of the SriLanka Constitution

Reference: SL constitution, section 157A:

Article 157A of the 6th Amendment to the Constitution under the Heading ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Prohibition against violation of territorial integrity of Sri LankaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ clearly states the following:

157A. (1) No person shall, directly or indirectly, in or outside Sri Lanka, support, espouse, promote, finance, encourage or advocate the establishment of a separate State within the territory of Sri Lanka.

(2) No political party or other association or organisation shall have as one of its aims or objects the establishment of a separate State within the territory of Sri Lanka.

(3) Any person who acts in contravention of the provisions of paragraph (1) shall, on conviction by the Court of Appeal, after trial on indictment and according to such procedure as may be prescribed by law,ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”‚

The punishment for a Member of Parliament / Political Party or other association or Organization is also clearly given.

(d) if he is a Member of Parliament or a person in such service or holding such office as is referred to in paragraph (1) of Article 165, cease to be such Member or to be in such service or to hold such office

(4) Where any political party or other association or organisation has as one of its aims or objects the establishment of a separate State within the territory of Sri Lanka, any person may make an application to the Supreme Court for a declaration that such political party or other association or organisation has as one of its aims or objects the establishment of a separate State within the territory of Sri Lanka. The Secretary or other officer of such political party or other association or organisation shall be made a respondent to such application.

The preservation of this section of the constitution does make SL citizens understand that all politicians, no matter what race, religion they belong to, shall not violate the constitution.

SriLanka constitution is an instrument to govern SriLanka. No foreign country should interfere with the Rule of Law in SL.

In spite this section 157A still in the Constitution, Tamil politicians are all out crying, and moaning for separation. Tamil politicians run to Geneva, Canada and UK and cry for separation. Does this mean that our Constitution is weak and not to be taken with seriousness. Does it mean that the ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Rule of LawƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ is absent in SL. Gajendrakumar Ponnambalam has a recorded version of ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Separate Tamil ElamƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬, and wherever he goes plays this record.

Legal action should be taken against whoever preaches separatism as per section 157A of the constitution.

Conclusion

Previous governments have been playing on the intelligence of the SriLankan masses to be in power. Such action has driven the country to the current situation.

The best solution is: (a) All Tamil political parties should rid their minds from naming their political parties ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-Tamil Elam ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬¦.ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬, (b) Remove separation, and Elam from their minds, (c) think and accept they are SriLankan, (d) accept their governance is in Kotte and NOT Jaffna or Chennai, (e) understand the negative effects of having PCs, (f) for conflict resolution, run to Kotte and not Chennai or Delhi, (g) Share power with the Kotte government and develop the whole country, (h) eliminate xenophobic attitude, (i) develop an eager to study Sinhala language, (j) accept the President of SriLanka as their leader, (k) learn to co-exist, and (l) become integral and NOT differential.

An appeal to all politicians (opposition and back-benchers):

It is construed that PCs are a burden to the economy and will drain the economy and make SL to depend on foreign aids. ƒÆ’-¡ PLEASE SUPPORT REVOKING THE 13TH AMENDMENT IN PARLIAMENT.

WE LOVE SRILANKA,

JAYA WEVA

Venerable late Bowatte Indarathana thero- and the lessons to be learnt from the tragedy.

June 1st, 2013

By Charles.S.Perera

ƒÆ’-¡ Some call it a suicide, others a sacrifice against slaughter of ƒÆ’-¡ cattle.ƒÆ’-¡  If the Communities in Sri Lanka, including the Muslims who kill animals inside their homes to celebrate their religious festivitiesƒÆ’-¡  Eid al-Adha, and Hindus sacrificing ƒÆ’-¡ animals in thousand for a religious ceremony in Munneswaram ƒÆ’-¡ show compassionƒÆ’-¡  and give up these savage religious customs and let the cattle live in freedom without fear of being food for the people, ƒÆ’-¡ it would beƒÆ’-¡  a great achievement, which would also glorify the act of self immolation of an innocent, kind, and compassionate beingƒÆ’-¡  who was a Buddhist Priest.

ƒÆ’-¡ Nevertheless, the suicide is against the basic tenants of Buddhism and should be condemned as in the prevailing ignorance of Buddhist vinaya among the young Buddhist monks, we may have an avalanche of suicides even to promote changes in the University system, changes in the dress of monks, for the issue of free motor vehicle licences, more employment for monks in the government sector etcetera.

ƒÆ’-¡ But this act of a Buddhist Priest also highlights the unfortunate state of the prevailingƒÆ’-¡  condition of rapid degenerationƒÆ’-¡  of the Buddha Sasana in Sri Lanka.ƒÆ’-¡  This ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-malaiseƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ began with the removal of the Pirivena system of education for the Buddhist monks, making them equal to lay students whose discipline hasƒÆ’-¡  deteriorated and the University System of Sri Lanka itself is becoming institutions of indiscipline, and their contributions as institutions of higher education ƒÆ’-¡ are being questioned.

ƒÆ’-¡ Buddha wanted a monastic environment for those house holders who left their homes to followƒÆ’-¡  his teachings.ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡  It is only in such an environment a Buddhist monk will be able to keep the 227 vinaya rules and conduct himself as a monk.ƒÆ’-¡  Otherwise there would not be any difference between the laity and the priest, except in the dress.

ƒÆ’-¡ UnfortunatelyƒÆ’-¡  today the temples are far from being Monasteries, they have become comfortable homes. In the ancient Monasteries the Monks spent their time studying ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-dhammaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬, discussing the teachings in groups and meditating under the guidance of senior monks.

ƒÆ’-¡ Therefore in a monastic atmosphereƒÆ’-¡  the minds of theƒÆ’-¡  Buddhist monks were constantly kept within the boundaries of the ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-dhammaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬.ƒÆ’-¡  The monksƒÆ’-¡  could under such conditions maintain mindfulness, andƒÆ’-¡  keep the minds free from defilements (kilesa). ƒÆ’-¡ 

ƒÆ’-¡ In the present day Universities the student monks imitate the lay students rather than allowing the lay students to follow the disciplined, soft speaking, calm and collected serenity of a Buddhist monk.( ?)ƒÆ’-¡  The Buddhist monks should avoid temptation, lust, desire, ƒÆ’-¡ ill will and maintain a carefulƒÆ’-¡  control of theƒÆ’-¡  mind,ƒÆ’-¡  speech and physical action.ƒÆ’-¡  This is possible in a priestlyƒÆ’-¡  mindful existence , with a training in meditation. Does such an atmosphere exist any where in any Temple in Sri Lanka ?

Today the Temple is not a rallying point of spirituality with enlightened wisdom influenced by the teaching of the Buddha, but they have become centres of political discussion, gathering places of non-descript persons drawing the young monks to vice such as taking , liquor , drug and even participate in theft of sacred treasures within temples.ƒÆ’-¡  This happened in a village temple I know.

ƒÆ’-¡ Indiscipline begins in small ways and if no corrective measures are taken they becomes widespread.ƒÆ’-¡  In the former days, we saw monks in villages with well shaven heads, and properly dressedƒÆ’-¡  in their yellow robes as they should be worn by a Buddhist monk. They walked one after the other according to their seniority.ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡  Today such a sightƒÆ’-¡  would be a ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-luxuryƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’-¡ for the Buddhist laity . I have noticed Buddhist monks wearing the robe like a sari using one end of it to cover the shoulders !!!

It is time that the Buddhist Monks ,the Buddhist laity and Buddhist Associations wake up atleast now after this unfortunateƒÆ’-¡  case of a self immolation of the Buddhist Monk Bowatte Indrathana to reform the Buddha Sasana and take it back to what it had been before.ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡  The Prime Minister of Sri Lanka who is in charge of the Ministry of Buddha Sasana is too old and weak ƒÆ’-¡ and has no vision to make valuable reforms for the welfare of the BuddhaSasana.

ƒÆ’-¡ It is time the Prime Minister of Sri LankaƒÆ’-¡  retires to give the place to a younger and more active person.ƒÆ’-¡  It is a weakness of the President not to make essential changes in the Cabinet and important political changesƒÆ’-¡  withoutƒÆ’-¡  allowingƒÆ’-¡  the problems get more serious as the time passes.ƒÆ’-¡  This is the case with regard to the 13 Amendment and the bunch ofƒÆ’-¡  the TNA terrorists hanging on as Parliamentarians of Sri Lanka openly calling for the division of the country.

ƒÆ’-¡ It is not the presentation of Sannas Patra appointing monks to special position that is necessary,ƒÆ’-¡  but it is to get them to clean the Sasana of ills, removingƒÆ’-¡  elements that would be a danger to the Buddha Sasana and undertake ƒÆ’-¡ a complete overhaul of the Sasana from Education of the monks to re organise the Temples as Monasteries, with Meditation Kuties and halls for residents monks for their studies ofƒÆ’-¡  Sacred Texts, and memorising them in groups.

ƒÆ’-¡ Monks are being murdered, accused for rape, charged for driving under influence of liquor.ƒÆ’-¡  These were unheard of and when things come down to such a deplorable level some one has to intervene to say ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-stopƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ and be fearless to call forƒÆ’-¡  immediate changes before the situation goes out of hand.

I have been to many Countries and visited Catholic Monasteries, where they maintain strict religious discipline.ƒÆ’-¡  There are no young priests hanging around ƒÆ’-¡ outside the Monasteries ƒÆ’-¡ doing nothing. They all have their Bible in hand and spend their time usefully learning and recitingƒÆ’-¡  prayers , while others do cultivation of plots of land to provide necessities for the Monastery.ƒÆ’-¡ 

Our temples are the contrast.ƒÆ’-¡  Once IƒÆ’-¡  walked around the Asgiriya templeƒÆ’-¡  and was surprised to see young monksƒÆ’-¡  behind the temple with cigarettes in their mouths, apparently hanging about in groups having nothing to do. I also met a group of young monks in the Kandy Market standing together laughing talking loud and making gesticulations.ƒÆ’-¡ 

Of course all these things could be treated lightly as these monks are not Arahants, but can we forget the fact that they are aspiring to be Arahants, having given up a comfortable home life to be mendicants.ƒÆ’-¡  But is that their ambition or is it to learn Geography, EconomicsƒÆ’-¡  and Commerce in a University , ƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ disrobe and do a job later.ƒÆ’-¡  Unfortunately that is what it has come to.ƒÆ’-¡  If the trend continues we will soonƒÆ’-¡  find men with a yellow thread round their wrists as a sign of his belonging to Buddhist Priesthood.

ƒÆ’-¡ The Ministry of Buddha Sasana is inactive it should be handed over to a Minister who would have the courage to bring about changes necessary to uplift theƒÆ’-¡  Buddha Sasana , by re-establishing the Pirivena system.ƒÆ’-¡ 

ƒÆ’-¡ He should immediately organise a ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-mini -Buddhist CouncilƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ to reorganise the Buddha Sasana in Sri Lanka by getting the three Nikayas together and make the Mahanayaka theros, a functional institution able to control the Order of the Sangha, strict on keeping Uposatha, and taking strict disciplinary action against ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-miscreantsƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬.ƒÆ’-¡ 

ƒÆ’-¡ The Mahanayaka Theros should be assisted by a committee of senior monks of all three Nikayas as administrators who should meet regularly every month to examine the situation with regard to the Community of Sangha in Sri Lanka, and see that the monks keep their Vinaya, andƒÆ’-¡  make recommendations of necessary actions to be taken by the Mahanayake Theros.

TNA Says, ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-No Solution under Unitary StateƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬

June 1st, 2013

Asada M Erpini

ƒÆ’-¡ The statement of the Tamil National Alliance (TNA) MP Mavai Senathirajah, reported in the Sri Lankan media on 31 May, that ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-a power sharing arrangement under a unitary state would not solve the national questionƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ is the clearest indication so far that TNA has not moved an inch away from the separatist ideology of the LTTE. Then again, TNA is what it is today because it got ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”electedƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢ with the blessings of the LTTE and served as the mouthpiece of the LTTE. SenathirajahƒÆ’-¡ implying that only a separate state would solve the national question – whatever that may be ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” is therefore hardly surprising.

ƒÆ’-¡ As far as the peace-loving Sri Lankans are concerned, the national question is that a group of Tamils who became MPƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s with the blessings of the LTTE leader are still hung up with the separatist mentality of Pirabhaharan. The valiant armed forces of Sri Lanka sacrificed a great deal to get rid of this very ideology of a mono-ethnic Tamil North. In this connection, it is not clear to what extent the average Sri Lankan Tamil, even the one living in the North, prefers to live under the jackboot of Pirabhaharan as opposed to being ruled by the leader of the much-maligned ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”Sinhalese governmentƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢.

ƒÆ’-¡ All Sri Lankans who love their country ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” the country that gives them free education, free healthcare, and for its MPƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s including TNAƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s ƒÆ’-¡ SenathirajahƒÆ’-¡ many enviable facilities and access to luxuries that the average citizen can only dream of ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” want Sri Lanka to be a unitary state. And, that unitary state extends, from Devundara in the South to Point Pedro in the North, and Madakalapuwa or Gokanna (currently referred to as Trincomalee) in the East to Mannarama or Puttalama in the West.

ƒÆ’-¡ It is to preserve Sri Lanka as a unitary state that tens of thousands of men and women in uniform, especially from the rural areas of the country, gave life and limb. After the LTTE was vanquished by the armed forces, people including Senathirajah can now move about freely in the country, with no fear of being blasted to smithereens by an LTTE bomb.

ƒÆ’-¡ The best that could be done with the people of the calibre of Senathirajah is to direct them to a statement made by the Russian President Vladimir Putin to the Duma (parliament) that has been quoted by Nalliah ThayabharanƒÆ’-¡  in Lankaweb on 31 May:

ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ…-In Russia live Russians. Any minority, from anywhere, if it wants to live in Russia, to work and eat in Russia, should speak Russian, and should respect the Russian laws. ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬¦ Russia does not need minorities. Minorities need Russia, and we will not grant them special privileges, or try to change our laws to fit their desires, no matter how loud they yell ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ”¹…”discriminationƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢. ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬¦ When this honourable legislative body thinks of creating new laws, it should have in mind the national interest first, observing that the minorities are not Russians.

 

 

ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”-ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»

June 1st, 2013

ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶©ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘

ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ , ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶», ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”-ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ,

1. ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶º.
2. ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶©ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶º.
3. ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶º.
4. ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶º.
5. ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶º.

ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”. ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”. ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·”- ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶©ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ , ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”- ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡.

ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶± “ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶« ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘” ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶§, ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶« ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶±,ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶º”ƒÆ’-¡  ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¹ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶®ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘. ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡, ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡. “ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶« ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘” ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶° ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶±, ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”-ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‘. ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶° ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘. ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”-ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”- ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘.

ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬, ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ”¹…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ” ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶º” ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶« ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‘. ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ”¹…”ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…- ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶§;ƒÆ’-¡  ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯? ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡.

ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§; ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º, ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º. ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”- ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬, ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º, ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡.

ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘. ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶», ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡. ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ , ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ , ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶° ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶º.

‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º, ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”- ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ”¹…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶©ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘, ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶« ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶º. ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯? ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶º. ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶º. ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”, ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”- ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”-, ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶« ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·, ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¹ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…” ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶©ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚°ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”, ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ , ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‘. ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶° ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶½ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶° ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶º. ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶°ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ · ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”…¾ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·”…”ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶º. ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶º ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶§ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶¸ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¾‚¢ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚  ƒÆ’‚ ¶”‚¦ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶¶ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒÆ’‚ ¶° ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶» ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ ƒÆ’‚ ¶ºƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ·”‚ƒÆ’‚ ¶º.

ƒÆ’‚ ¶ ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶¯ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ¶»ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ƒÆ’‚ ¶± ƒÆ’‚ ¶´ƒÆ’‚ ¶«ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚ ƒÆ’‚ ¶©ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶­ƒÆ’‚ ¶ƒ…-ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ…‚¡ ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ·ƒ” -â„¢ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘ƒÆ’‚ ¶±ƒÆ’‚ ·”‘

Dispatch Buddhist delegation on fact finding mission from Sri Lanka to Myanmar

June 1st, 2013

Shenali D Waduge

ƒÆ’-¡ There is a crisis evolving in Myanmar and the Buddhist nations of the world can no longer remain idle and indifferent but must now stand in solidarity with a nation facing the wrath of foreign elements out to destabilize it. We cannot trust the biased and distorted versions that come from mainstream international news agencies which are funded to write according to what suits Western agendas. On the one hand Myanmar is being targeted as a gateway to eventually attack China while Wahhabi incursions using Rohingyas are arming jihadists to create further chaos. In the past Myanmar came to the aid of Sri Lanka on many an occasion at times of need and it is the duty and moral obligation of Sri Lanka to reciprocate and now send a fact finding mission comprising both lay and Buddhist monks to Myanmar.ƒÆ’-¡ 

ƒÆ’-¡ With gratitude to Dr. Hema Goonetilake whose comprehensive compilation of the Sri Lanka-Burma ties enables us to know more of the bond that the two nations share. It was in 1069 that help was sought by King Vijayabahu 1 and King Anawrahta ( Anuruddha) sent ships of supplies in aid of Buddhist Ceylon from Myanmar to defeat the Chola invaders and thereafter King VijayabahuƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s request for scriptures and monks in 1071 resulted in 20 Burmese monks re-ordaining the entire clergy of Sri Lanka. King VijayabahuƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s gift was a replica of the Buddha Tooth which remains enshrined in the Lawkananda Pagoda in Pagan. This is recorded in the Chulavamsa. It is also to be noted that the BurmeseƒÆ’-¡ chronicles such asƒÆ’-¡ Mahasammatavamsa,ƒÆ’-¡ RajavamsaƒÆ’-¡ andƒÆ’-¡ SasanavamsaƒÆ’-¡ were directly modelled after theƒÆ’-¡ Mahavamsa.

Many may not be aware too that the King of Burma (contemporary with Parakramabahu 1 ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” 1153-1186) married a daughter of a Sinhalese King and even appointed an ambassador to Sri Lanka.

ƒÆ’-¡ Even when relationships between the two nations had strained due to trade the Sinhala Bhikkhus had come forward to restore the relations which depicts the bond that exists on a religious dimension that supersedes that of politics. ƒÆ’-¡ 

ƒÆ’-¡ The controversial Arakan (Rakhine) area was described in 1433 as the Golden Age of Arakan Theravada Buddhism with the Tripitaka brought from Sri Lanka placed near the image of Mahamuni. Even Portuguese historian Queroz mentions a major Buddhist temple destroyed in 1620 in Trincomalee which had been headed by a Buddhist monk from Arakan indicating that Burmese monks were in Sri Lanka managing temples and the ties that existed.

ƒÆ’-¡ It was following the arrival of the colonials and their brutal conversions to Christianity that affected Buddhism leaving King Vimaladharmasuriya 1 (1592-1604) to again seek the assistance of Myanmar to send a mission from Arakan to confer upasampada on Sinhala Samaneras. ƒÆ’-¡ 

ƒÆ’-¡ The ties between Sri Lanka Myanmar are solid. Both nations practice Theravada Buddhism as does Thailand whose Prime Minister presently in Sri Lanka declared to the Sri Lankan Parliament the need to tie Buddhism further. From Thailand we have received the upasampada to establish the Siam Nikaya in 1753 with the Asgiriya and Malwatte Chapters while from Myanmar we have the Amarapura and Ramanna Nikayas ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” all denoting a very powerful bloc. Together with ChinaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s 1,070,893,447 Buddhist population it is now desirable to create the League of Buddhist Nations under the leadership and patronage of China.ƒÆ’-¡ 

ƒÆ’-¡ It is evident that the ties that bind Sri Lanka and Myanmar go beyond a 1000 years. With the rise of Asia, the intrusions by forces seeking to destabilize and balkanize Asian nations warrants the Buddhist world to unite and build a force to respond to the threats that arise in both covert and overt forms.

ƒÆ’-¡ As Myanmar faces a plethora of obstacles it is up to the Buddhists of Sri Lanka to remember the assistance given to Sri Lanka in the past when we were in dire strait following Chola invasions and on several occasions thereafter and we need to now show our gratitude and render assistance to our good friends in Myanmar.

ƒÆ’-¡ As an initial step the best possible way is to first send a fact finding mission to Myanmar comprising Buddhist laymen and monks so that their findingsƒÆ’-¡  can quell the lies and fabrications that are being spread by the international news agencies and their local agents that are paid to do so.

ƒÆ’-¡ Above all else, the Buddhist nations in Asia need to come together to create a formidable force with international cloutƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ i.e. League of Buddhist Nations, similar to OIC (Organisation of Islamic Co-operation ) and EU (European Union) and usher in a new phase in international relations by spreading the BuddhaƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬ƒ¢-¾‚¢s message of peace and harmonyƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ and compassion to all living beings (Ahimsa and Non ƒÆ’‚¢ƒ¢-¡‚¬”…” Violence) that had enormous influence in this part of the worldƒÆ’-¡ ƒÆ’-¡ for over two millennia before it got diluted and suppressed by the destructive tendencies of the colonial west that invaded Asia, Africa and several other parts of the world

 

 


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